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Matches 101 to 200 of 1725

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   Notes   Linked to 
101 probably died young. Atwell Benjamin
 
102 Her and her husband were living with her parents during the 1870 Census (ADV 9/25/09). Atwell Henrietta
 
103 Moved to the State of New York. Atwell Jehu
 
104 IV. JOSEPH (28), b. about 1740, son of Joseph Atwell (10); m. 8 Feb., 1769, Lucretia, his second cousin, b. 19 Nov., 1749, daughter of Samuel Atwell and Mary . He settled in Montville on Dolbeare Hill. Was a farmer. He died about 1800. His wife survived, him, and died 26 Oct., 1851, aged 102 years nearly. The day after she had completed her century of years, a party of neighbors and friends made her a donation visit, carrying with them provisions for several days' supply, and spreading a bountiful table, at which she sat with her guests, and partook of a thanksgiving dinner. In the center of the table was placed a pie, designed to be as much beyond the common size as she was older than the common age of her sex. The aged mother enjoyed the feast like one that had renewed their youth, declaring with' animation that though she had lived a hundred years, and had seen a vast number of things, she had never before seen so large a mince pie, nor so many kind friends together. The aged pilgrim had always led a quiet country life, living in a plain and frugal manner, and devoting her days and years to simple household duties. She was esteemed by her neighbors for her kindness, and thankful spirit for kind returns, possessing a Christian hope of immortal life.

At this time a stranger would have estimated her age as about eighty-five. Her motions were quick, her replies to questions prompt and intelligent, her memory retentive, and showed large observation of incidents and narratives. Being questioned by one of her visitors in regard to the French war, which terminated in 1763, she spoke of it as a thing of but yesterday. She had a vivid recollection ofthe coming home of her friends and neighbors from campaigns in the war, and particularly of the return of her uncle, Benjamin Atwell, who had been absent a long time, "soldering agin the French in Canada." For the last fifty years of her life, she and her daughter, Nancy Thompson, had lived together in the old house, where she first went to housekeeping, and where she died. 
Atwell Joseph
 
105 IV. JOSEPH (28), b. about 1740, son of Joseph Atwell (10); m. 8 Feb., 1769, Lucretia, his second cousin, b. 19 Nov., 1749, daughter of Samuel Atwell and Mary . He settled in Montville on Dolbeare Hill. Was a farmer. He died about 1800. His wife survived, him, and died 26 Oct., 1851, aged 102 years nearly. The day after she had completed her century of years, a party of neighbors and friends made her a donation visit, carrying with them provisions for several days' supply, and spreading a bountiful table, at which she sat with her guests, and partook of a thanksgiving dinner. In the center of the table was placed a pie, designed to be as much beyond the common size as she was older than the common age of her sex. The aged mother enjoyed the feast like one that had renewed their youth, declaring with' animation that though she had lived a hundred years, and had seen a vast number of things, she had never before seen so large a mince pie, nor so many kind friends together. The aged pilgrim had always led a quiet country life, living in a plain and frugal manner, and devoting her days and years to simple household duties. She was esteemed by her neighbors for her kindness, and thankful spirit for kind returns, possessing a Christian hope of immortal life.

At this time a stranger would have estimated her age as about eighty-five. Her motions were quick, her replies to questions prompt and intelligent, her memory retentive, and showed large observation of incidents and narratives. Being questioned by one of her visitors in regard to the French war, which terminated in 1763, she spoke of it as a thing of but yesterday. She had a vivid recollection ofthe coming home of her friends and neighbors from campaigns in the war, and particularly of the return of her uncle, Benjamin Atwell, who had been absent a long time, "soldering agin the French in Canada." For the last fifty years of her life, she and her daughter, Nancy Thompson, had lived together in the old house, where she first went to housekeeping, and where she died. 
Atwell Lucretia
 
106 died young. Atwell Richard
 
107 II. RICHARD (6), b. 1679, son of Benjamin Atwell (1); m. 11 March, 1702, Elizabeth Baker, b. 9 May, 1676, daughter of Joshua Baker and Hannah (Tongue) Mintern. He settled in the North Parish of New London near to Oxoboxo Pond. He owned the farm which his heirs afterwards sold to Asahel Otis. His first wife died about 1709, and ho afterwards married Joanna _____. He died 15 Oct., 1727.

Children by Elizabeth.

11. Richard, bap. April, 1702; died young.
12. Benjamin, bap. 14 July, 1706; died 3 May, 1708.
13. Elizabeth, bap. 24 April, 1709; m. William Chapel, 23 June, 1726.
14. Richard, b. 19 Oct., 1709 ; m. Nabby or Abigail .

Children by Joanna.

15. Joanna, b. 10 Aug., 1716; m. Samuel Bill, 27 Nov.; 1740.
16. John, b. 19 Jan., 1718.
17. Benjamin, b. 18 Oct., 1719; m. Mercy Fox, 15 Aug., 1751.
18. Patience, b. 26 April, 1721.
19. Samuel, b. 8 June, 1723; m. 
Atwell Richard
 
108 III. SAMUEL (19), b. 8 June, 1723; married Mary, (probably) Leach. He settled at Montville, and for many years lived on a farm in Mohegan, which he had leased. He died previous to 1776.

Children.

38. Lucretia, b. 19 Nov., 1749; m. Joseph Atwell (28).
39. Mima, b. ; died unm.
40. Mary, b. ; died unm.
41. Susan, b.
42. Jason, b. ; m. Williams.
43. Samuel, b. May, 1755; m. Betsey Vibber.
44. Jehn, b. . Moved to the State of New York.
45. Delight, b.. 1771. Ilad one son, Thomas Jefferson, who died unm. 
Atwell Samuel
 
109 IV. SAMUEL (43), b. May, 1755, son of Samuel Atwell (19); m. Betsey Vibber, b. 31 Aug., 1774, daughter of Nathaniel Vibber. He was a farmer, and lived on an Indian farm at Mohegan. He died 26 Nov., 1850. She died 8 April, 1859.

Children.

50. Samuel Hazzard, b. 7 Jan., 1814; m. Harriet Church, and had one daughter, Henrietta, b. 18 April, 1846. 
Atwell Samuel
 
110 All information found on Bill prokasy's myheritage.com site 9/28/2008

Although her marriage to Acie took place when she was 21, apparently Lucy Austen was a widow and her surname is unknown. Both Andover and Methuen list her as "Mrs. Luce Austin" at the time of her marriage to Acie. 
Austen Lucy
 
111 John Russell Vibber Lists her name as Abbie.

The name of No. 1179, the seventh child of Oliver Avery, was Abby Ann, as recorded on page 319. She m. a Mr. Lathrop. 
Avery Abby Ann
 
112 battle of Cedar Creek Avery Albert
 
113 killed in the battle of Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864. Avery Albert
 
114 Albert Hammond Avery (Elisha Vibber, Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher) was b. June 7, 1833, at Bozrah; see Editorial Note on page 830; m. April 27, 1863, at Bozrah Harriet MariaMitchell, dau. of James A. and Belinda (Maynard) Mitchell. She was b. July 8, 1845, at Uncasville and d. June 6, 1899, at Mystic. He lives at Bozrah.

Child of Albert Hammond and Harriet Maria (Mitchell) Avery, b. at Salem:
i. Leander Adelbert, b. April 27, 1864.

Detail: Connecticut Divorces, Superior Court Records for the Counties of New London, Tolland, and Windham.
Date: 1719-1910
Notes: Located at New London, CT Public Library. 
Avery Albert Hammond
 
115 i. Austin Elisha, b. Jan. 7, 1843, at Uniondale, Pa.; in 1899, he was living at Council Bluffs, Ia.

He is listed as single and not widowed in 1910 census, probably never married and no kids? (ADV 9/11/2009) 
Avery Austin Elisha
 
116 Celinda Imogene Avery (Elisha Vibber, Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher) was b. Aug. 25, 1846, at Salem; see Editoral Note on page 830; m. Feb. 11, 1867, at Norwich, Albert Randall, s. of Grizel and Harriet (Rathbone) Randall. She m. 2d, Nov. 7, 1889, at New Haven, Charles Edwin Dart, s. of Benjamin Franklin and Sarah (Culver) Dart. He was b. Oct. 15, 1854, at Waterford. Residence, Wallingford.

Child of Albert and Celinda Imogene (Avery) Randall, b. at Colchester:
i. Annie Idella, b. March 7, 1868; m. Charles McGregor.

Her family was living with her sister Harriet's family during the 1870 Census (ADV 9/15/09). 
Avery Celinda Imogene or Emma C.
 
117 I. CHRISTOPHER AVERY, the emigrant ancestor and progenitor of the Avery family, was born in England about 1590. He was a weaver by trade, and came to this country and located at Gloucester, Mass., where he was selectman in 1646, 1652 and 1654. At a court in Salem he took the freeman's oath, June 29, 1692, and was chosen clerk of the band, constable, and clerk of the market. His wife did not come to this country. In 1658 he sold lands at Gloucester and removed to Boston, where on the 16th of March, 1658-9 he purchased land, a small lot, about twenty-six by forty-six feet. It was located in what is now the centre of the post-office building, facing on Devonshire street. The famous old spring, which gave the name to Spring Lane and which is now preserved under the post-office, was near. ThisAvery plot was a part of, or at least adjoined, the site of two notable resorts of later days — the well known restaurant whence first came the famous "Julien soup," and the "Stackpole House," not much less famous. The Winthrop estate was not far away, and near by, in after years, Benjamin Franklin was born. Christopher Avery did not long retain this property, for March 22, 1663, he sold land to Ambrose Dew, for forty pounds. There had evidently been no increase of value in the five years that he had held possession. After being owned by two or three different persons, it was bought by Mr. Stackpole about 1790. Christopher Avery now followed his son James to Connecticut, and August 8, 1665, purchased a house, orchard and lot of Robert Burrows in New London. Here he claimed exemption from watching and training, on account of age, in June, 1667, and was made freeman of the colony October, 1669. He died March 12, 1670, by Minor diary.

says Christopher died 3/12/1679 in Founders and Patriots of America Index, page 7 
Avery Christopher
 
118 MRS. HANNAH AVERY PARTRIDGE.

Born in Chaplin, Connecticut.
Widow of Frederick P. Partridge.

Descendant of Rev. David Avery. Daughter of David Avery, Jr., and Rebecca Brown Morgan, his wife. Granddaughter of Rev. David Avery and Hannah Chaplin, his wife.

David Avery, (1746-1818), was pastor of a church in Gage- boro, Mass., at the Lexington Alarm. He preached a farewell sermon, raised a company from his congregation and reported at Cambridge. The first Sunday in camp he preached to the army and was commissioned chaplain. He was at Bunker Hill, Long Island, in the Jersey campaign, at Valley Forge, in service until 1780 when he resigned. He was wasborn in Franklin, Conn.,

16. REV. DAVID AVERY

Was born 5 April, 1746, in that part of Norwich, Ct., now forming the town of Franklin. His parents were John and Lydia (Smith) Avery.* He was converted to God at about twenty years of age, under thepreaching of Whitefield. Fitted
for college at Dr. Wheelock's school, in Lebanon, Ct. Entered Yale College a year in advance, and graduated 1769, A. M. in course, and also at Dartmouth, 1773. Employed in his vacations teaching Indian schools. Studied theology with Rev. Dr. E. Wheelock of Dartmouth Coll. Preached a short time on Long Island as a licentiate. Was soon ordained, probably at Dartmouth, 29 August, 1771, as missionaryto the Oneida Indians, and colleague with Rev. Mr. Kirkland, father of President Kirkland of Harvard University.

He was compelled to leave this field of. labor by a bad fall upon the ice, when he returned to New England. After preaching in different places, he was installed at Gageboro', now Windsor, 25 March, 1773, and dismissed 14 April, 1777,** to go as chaplain in the army. On his return he was settled at Bennington, Vt., 3 May, 1780, and dismissed 17 June, 1783 ; again settled at Wrentham, 25 May, 1786; and after many councils and much difficulty, dismissed 21 April,
1794. He still preached to a congregation at North Wrentham, where a church was organized in 1795. He left previous to
1798, and removed his family to a farm belonging to his wife in Mansfield, now Chaplin, Ct., and employed himself in preaching in vacant places in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont. He performed two missionary tours in the western frontiers of New York, and one in Maine, under the direction of the Massachusetts Domestic Missionary Society.*** He afterwards gathered a new church and society,called the Union Church, in Chaplin, Ct., to which he preached from 1798 to 1801. In 1817, October 28, he visited his daughter, Mrs. Hewett, then resident in Shepardstown, Va., where, and in the vicinity, he preached a few weeks. He received a cordial and unanimous call to settle in Middletown, fifteen miles from Shepardstown, where he was taken (on the evening of a day of fasting preparatory to his installation) with the typhus fever, of which he died. He was buried on the week of his intended installation, the clergy of the invited council officiating as his bearers. Mr. Avery married, 10 Oct., 1782, Hannah Chaplin, daughter of Dea. Benjamin Chaplin, of Mansfield, Ct. Her mother was Mary Paine, cousin of Judge Robert Treat Paine of Boston, and aunt of Judge Elijah Paine of Vermont.
They had four children :
1. Mary C., married to William H. Smith, Esq., and still living at Providence, R. I.
2. David, jr. ; graduated at Brown University ; lawyer ; married Miss Morgan, and resides in Hampton, Ct.
3. Hannah, married to Chester D. Clarke, merchant of Utica, N. Y.
4. Lydia S., married to Lieut. Thomas Hewitt, U. S. Army ; and resided in Shepardstown, Va., where both deceased.

* The first of the paternal line in New England was John Avery, a Scotchman, who wilh his wife and children, — four sons and several daughters, — settled in Truro, where he died. Two of the sons settled in Connecticut, from one of which Rev. Mr. A. descended. John Avery, former Secretary of the state of Massachusetts, and also Rev. Dr. Griffin. President of Wms. Coll., were cousins of Rev. David Avery. See Letter of AV. H. Smith, Esq., Prov. R. I. The first minister of Truro was Rev. John Avery, son of Robert, and grandson of Doct. William Avery of Dedham. Was he the same person 1 See notice of the Avery family, hy W. R. Deane. Boston.

**His commission was dated 18 April, 1776. He resigned it 1 Feb. 1780. He was attached to Col. Sherhorn's regiment, Continental army. Served from 15 Feb., 1777, to 5 March, 1780. — State Records.

***Rev. David Avery and Rev. 'Jacob Cram, (Licentiate, No. 15,)
were the first missionaries commissioned by the Society. 
Avery David
 
119 Mrs. Andrews of Hope Valley Dead
Edith Mary Andrews, 69, wife of the late Clifford S. Andrews Sr. of Main Street, Hope Valley and mother of Loren A. Andrews, chairman of the Hopkinton School Committee, died yesterday at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston. Born in Colchester, Conn., on April 21, 1899, she was a daughter of the late John L. and Addie (Mahoney) Avery. She was a communicant of the Hope Valley Baptist Church, a member of the Little Rest Audubon Bird Society, the Hope Valley Ambulance Corps Auxillary and the Hope Valley Homemakers, and a trustee of the Langworthy Public Library. In addition to her son, Loren, she is survived by another son, Clifford S. Andrews Jr., also of Hope Valley; three sisters, Mrs. Howard Prince of Wakefield, Mrs. Harry Sidebottom of Ashaway and Mrs. Aubrey Blacklock of Hope Valley;and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. at the Hope Valley Baptist Church. Interment will be in the Pine Grove Cemetery in Hope Valley.

Notes: Edith's middle name is incorrect. It should be May. 
Avery Edith May
 
120 1175. Elisha Avery (Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher). Elisha V. Avery m. Sept. 23, 1832, at Bozrah, Mary Hammond. They lived at Bozrah. No children recorded.

Editorial Note.- Since printing the incomplete records of the children of Oliver Avery, Nos. 1175-1179, pages 319 and 513, we have received further information concerning the family.

The name of No. 1175 was Elisha Vibber Avery. His wife's name was Mary Louise Hammond; she was dau. of William and Melinda (Avery) Hammond. The parentage of this Melinda Avery has not been ascertained. Elisha Vibber Avery was a carpenter. He d. June 8, 1862, at Bozrah; she d. May 11, 1891, at Colchester.

Children of Elisha Vibber and Mary Louise (Hammond) Avery:
i. Albert Hammond, b. June 7, 1833, at Bozrah.
ii. Henry Elisha, b. Dec. 10, 1884, at Bozrah.
iii. Mary Ann, b. Sept. 15, 1838, at Bozrah.
iv. John Lauren, b. Nov. 2, 1840, at Bozrah.
v. Harriet Jane, b. June 25, 1844, at Bozrah.
vi. Celinda Imogene, b. Aug. 25, 1846.
There were three other children who died young.

Detail: Town of Salem, CT
Date: 8 Jul 1862
Notes:
Actual text: Portion of the record - On the estate of Elisha V. Avery, late of Salem deceased. represented by administrator Mary L. Avery, insolvent. At the Court of Probate on July 25, 1862 articles belonging to the estate and their value were recorded. The total amount of the property was $213.80.

Detail: Salem, CT
Date: 7 Jun 1862
Notes: Last name of Avery is misspelled.
Date of death on gravestone is June 8, 1862.
Actual text: Elisha Avory; Age 55; Male; Married; Cause of death, suicide; Occuption, carpenter; Residence, Salem; Physician, WL Marcy Brown.

Detail: Town Hall, Bozrah, CT
Date: 23 Sep 1832
Notes: Vol. 1, page 113
Actual text: This may certify that Elisha V. Avery and Mary Hammond were joined together in marriage September 23, 1832 by me Asa Wilcox, Elder. 
Avery Elisha Vibber
 
121 She and her sister Francis were living with sister Edith's family during the 1930 Census (ADV 9/17/09).

Detail: Westerly Sun, obituary
Date: 23 Jul 1873
Notes: Birth date is incorrect. It should be May 6, 1909.
Actual text: Mrs. Elsie I. (Avery) Blacklock, 63, wife of Aubrey C. Blacklock, died yesterday at her home on Main St., Hope Valley. Born in Richmond, March 6, 1909, she was a daughter of the late John L. and Addie (Mahoney) Avery. Surviving in addition to her husband are two daughters, Mrs. Lester D. Wilcox and Mrs. Norman A. Phillips of Hope Valley; a sister, Mrs. Harry Sidebottom of Ashaway; eight grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. The funeral service will be held tomorrow at 2 p.m. in the Avery Funeral Home, Hope Valley. Interment wil be in Pine Grove Cemetery, Hope Valley. Calling hours will be held this evening.

No children were born to Aubrey and Elsie, however, they did raise two foster children; sisters, Elizabeth "Betty" and Barbara Wood. 
Avery Elsie Isabel
 
122 She and her sister Elsie were living with sister Edith's family during the 1930 Census (ADV 9/17/09).

Detail: Westerly Sun
Date:
Notes:
Actual text: Frances M. (Avery) Sidebottom, 63, wife of Harry Sidebottom of North Broad Street, Ashaway, died this morning at the Westerly Hospital. Mrs. Sidebottom had been employed for many years at the Bradford Dyeing Association. She was a member of Christ Episcopal Church and Chariho Senior Citizens. Born in Richmond Nov. 28, 1914, she was a daughter of the late John and Addie (Mahoney) Avery. Besides her husband, she is survived by a daughter, Barbara Fallon of the Potter Hill Road; two grandsons; and several nieces and nephews. The funeral service will be held in Christ Church Saturday at 1 p.m. Burial will be in River Bend Cemetery. Calling hours will be held at the Avery Funeral Hope, Hope Valley, tomorrow evening from 7 to 9.

Detail:
Date:
Notes:
Actual text: Hope Valley
Sidebottom-Avery
Miss Frances M. Avery, sister of Mrs. Clifford S. Andrews of Hope Valley, became the bride of Harry Sidebottom, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Sidebottom, Bowling Lane, Bradford, at 11 o'clock yesterdaymorning in the rectory of the Christ Episcopal church in Westerly, Rev. G. Edgar Tobin performed the ceremony. The attendants were Miss Ann F. Rich and Frederick M. Groppelli, both of Westerly. The bride wore a gown of peach organza with brown accessories, a leghorn picture hat, and carried a garden bouquet. The bridesmaid wore a gown of aquamarine lace and net with tea rose accessories, a leghorn picture hat and carried a garden bouquet. After the ceremony the wedding party was given a wedding breakfast by Frank Stettano at Les Rendezvous. A reception was given at the Legion Hall in Hope Valley in the afternoon. A buffet luncheon was served. After a wedding trip through the New England States the couple will reside in Bradford. 
Avery Frances Millicent
 
123 d. in Texas Avery Franklin
 
124 Ella is listed as having had 2 children but only was was still alive during 1900 census, Myra (ADV 9/14/09). Avery Fred
 
125 The name of No. 1176 was George Loren Avery. He went to Pennsylvania with his brother-in-law, Salmon Lothrop Gardner (No. 1177), and is supposed to have had the family mentioned on page 513.

1176. Loren Avery (Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher). Nothing definite is known about him. A George Loren Avery of Luzerne County, Penn., m. Mary Harding; they had a son Austin Elisha. This George Loren Avery m. 2d, Lucinda Harding, sister of his first wife, and had children, Lucinda, Mary Elizabeth, Urial Wright, and Loren Emmett. No connection has been traced between this family and the Groton Avery Clan.

Must have died before 1860 because he does not show up in the 1860 with his wife who had moved in with her brother and all their children (ADV 9/9/2009). 
Avery George Loren
 
126 Detail: Gardner-Bulkeley Cemetery, Bozrah, CT
Date:
Notes:
Actual text: Avery George W.
son of Elisha V. & Mary
died August 25, 1843
age 7 mos. 
Avery George W.
 
127 Harriet Jane Avery (Elisha Vibber, Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher) was b. June 25, 1844, at Bozrah; see Editorial Note on page 830; m. Daniel A. Crocker.

Her family was living with her sister Harriet's family during the 1870 Census (ADV 9/15/09).
She was the mother of two children but only one was listed as still living in the 1900/1910 Census' (ADV 9/15/09).
She was living with her daughter Elizabeth's family during 1920 Census (ADV 9/15/09).
 
Avery Harriet Jane
 
128 Detail: Gardner-Bulkeley Cemetery, Bozrah, CT
Date:
Notes:
Actual text: Avery Hattie M.
daughter of Elisha V. & Mary
died July 17, 1843, age 7. 
Avery Hattie M.
 
129 Henry Elisha Avery (Elisha Vibber, Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher) was b. Dec. 10, 1834, at Bozrah; see Editorial Note on page 830; m. March 5, 1871, Ella Elizabeth Chapman, dau. of Benjamin Franklin and Mary Elizabeth (Gates) Chapman. She was b. May 10, 1850, at Montville.

Children of Henry Elisha and Ella Elizabeth (Chapman) Avery:
i. Fred, b. Dec. 19, 1875; d. y.
ii. Myra Louise, b. March 17, 1886.

Looks like he was living with his Nephew John L. Avery jr. and his mother Mary L (Hammond) Avery during 1870 Census (ADV 9/16/09). 
Avery Henry Elisha
 
130 2. Capt. James Avery, the only child of Christopher, was born in 1620. Came to America with his father, and lived at Gloucester for several years. The Rev. Mr. Blinman, who had been the minister of Gloucester for eight years, was engaged to become the minister of the Pequot Plantation. A party of his friends proposed to move with him, and came on to make preparatory arrangements, Oct. 19, 1650. It appears that James Avery went back to Gloucester, sold his possession there to his father, and in 1651 returned to New London. In March of that year the principal body of these eastern families arrived. Capt. James acquired large tracts of land at what is now Poquonoc Bridge, Groton, east of New London. About 1636 he built the hive of the Avery's at the head of Poquonoc Plain, a mile and a half from the river Thames. In 1684, the old Blinman edifice, first church of New London, the unadorned church and water-tower of the wilderness, which had stood for thirty years, was sold to Capt. Avery for six pounds, with the condition that he should remove it in one month's time. According to tradition, the church was taken down, its materials carried across the river, and added to the house he hadalready built at Poquonoc. In spite of this analytic and synthetic process, the ancient dwelling seemed to have retained some of its sacred character, for a century later it was occupied until July 21, 1894, when a spark from a passing locomotive ignited its well-seasoned frame, and in a short time only the ancient chimney remained to mark the spot of this historic house of Eastern Connecticut. Afew years later the chimney was taken down, the grounds graded, and a tasteful monument was erected by the descendants of James Avery. He was ensign, lieutenant and captain of the New London companies and served throughout King Philip's war in command of forty Indians from Stonington, New London and Lyme. In 1676 he was captain of one of the four companies which protected the frontier, and for twenty-three years an officer of the town, and twelve times deputy to the General Court, 1656-80; also assisting judge in the Prerogative Court, and was most prominent in matters relating to the church,as references to him in such connections are numerous. He m. 1st, Nov. 10, 1643, Joanna Greenslade, b. about 1622 ; she d. after 1693. He m. 2nd, Mrs. Abigail (Ingraham) Chesebrough, widow of Joshua Holmes, July 4, 1698, (No. 2) Holmes family. He d. April 18, 1700. His widow was living at late as 1714.

The reference is to Lucretia, relict of Jonathan Brewster, (mother- in-law to Mr. Hill,) but no record of her death is to be found. James Avery in 1685 gives a deed to his four sons, of the house, orchard and land, "which belonged, (he says) to my deceased father Christopher Avery."

No other son but James, has been traced. It may be conjectured that this family came from Salisbury, England, as a Christopher Avery of that place, had wife Mary buried in 159 1.3

James Avery and Joanna Greenslade were married, Nov. 10th, 1643. This is recorded in Gloucester. The records of Boston church have the following entry. "

"17 of 1 mo. 1644. Our sister Joan Greenslade, now the wife of one James Averill had granted hr by the church's silence, letters of recommendation to the Ch. at Gloster."

The births of three children are recorded at Gloucester ; these are repeated at New London, and the others registered from time to time. The whole list is as follows.

Hannah, born Oct. 12th, 1644.
Rebecca, born Oct. 6th, 1656.
James, Dec. born 16th, 1646.
Jonathan, born Jan. 5th,, 1658-9.
Mary, born Feb. 19th, 1648.
Christopher,born Ap. 30th, 1661.
Thomas, born May 6th, 1651.
Samuel, born Aug. 14th, 1664.
John, born Feb. 10th, 1653-4.
Joanna, 1669.

James Avery was sixty-two years old in 1682 ; of course born on the other side of the ocean about 1620. At New London he took an important part in the affairs of the plantation. He was chosen townsmen in 1660 and held the office twenty-three years, ending with 1680. He was successively, ensign, lieutenant and captain of the only company of train-bands in the town, and was in active service through Philip's War. He was twelve times deputy to the General Court, between 1658 and 1680, and was in the commission of the peace, and sat as assistant judge in the county court. He removed to Pequonuck,east of the river, between 1660 and 1670, where both he and his wife were living in 1693. Deeds of lands to his sons, including the homestead farm, in Feb., 1693—4, probably indicate the near approach of death. His sons Jonathan and Christopher died young, and probably without issue. The descendants of James, Jr., Thomas, John, and Samuel, are very numerous, and may be regarded as four distinct streams of life. Groton is the principal hive of the family. '

AVERY FAMILIES.

The first of the name was Christopher Avery, who first appears in Gloucester, Mass., between 1646 and 1654, and at New London in 1665. In October, 1669, made freeman of the colony. He died at New London, but no date of his death is to be found. He must have been quite an old man, and born in the latter part of the sixteenth century. James, his son, in 1685, gives a deed to his four sons of the house, orchard, and land, "which," he says, "belonged to my deceased father, Christopher Avery."

This James Avery is the only son that can be traced. He married 10 Nov., 1643, Joanna Grcenslade, the record of which marriage is found recorded in Gloucester, Mass. Three or more of his children w?re born in Gloucester, and the remainder probably at Now London. At New London he took an active part in the affairs of the plantation. In 1660 he was chosen selectman, and held the offieo twenty-threeyears. He was successively ensign, lieutenant, and captain of the only train-band in the town, and was in activo service through King Philip's War. He was twelve times. deputy of the general court. His descendants have been very numerous, very many of them have been persons of distinction, filling position of honor in the church and state. It is not ascertained at what date he died, but deeds of Iands to his sons, including the homestead in February, 1693-4,.may indicate his near approach to death.

Children.

2. Hannah, b. 12 Oct., 1644.
3. James, b. I6 Dec., 1646.
4. Mary, b. 19 Feb., 1648.
5. Thomas, b. 6 May, 1651.
6. John, b. 10 Feb., 1653-4
7. Rebecca, b. 6 Oct., 1O?6.
8. Jonathan, b. 5 Jan., 1658-9.
9. Christopher, b. 30 April, 1661.
10. Samuel, b. 14 Aug., 1664, m. Susanna Palmer 25 Oct., 1686. Had a son, Jonathan, b. 18 Jan., 1688-9.
11. Joanna, b. , 1669. 
Avery James
 
131 Looks like he was living with his Uncle Henry E. Avery and grandmother Mary L (Hammond) Avery during 1870 Census (ADV 9/16/09).

Death of John Avery
The funeral of John Loren Avery, Jr. who died at his home here Sunday the 9th, following a few days illness with pneumonia, was held from the Baptist church here Wednesday afternoon. Rev. James Struthers, pastor of the Hope Valley Baptist Church, officiated, speaking words of comfort and timely warning in a practical, helpful way. There were numerous beautiful floral tributes. The bearers were Patrick Kelley, Albert Lamphear, William G. Kimber and William Kuber. The body was placed in the receiving vault at Pine Grove cemetery in Hope Valley, to be buried at the convenience of the family. Thedeceased, a son of John Loren and Sarah Avery, was born in Bozrah, Conn., May 20, 1866, and was in his 55th year. An industrious, faithful workman, a good husband and father and kind neighbor and friend, he is survived by his widow and five children, four daughters and one son, and by a cousiin, who resides in Mystic.

(Note: Year of birth is incorrect in the obituary.)

The graves of John Avery and his wife Addie Mahoney are located near the middle of the newer section of Pine Grove Cemetery. To the right of their gravestone are the gravestones of their son William,daughter Elsie and her husband Aubrey Blacklock, daughter Ruth and her husband Howard Prince and their daughter Gloria. To the left across the road are the gravestones of John and Addie's daughter Edith, her husband Clifford Andrews, and their son Loren and his wife Hope.
Note: The year of birth on John and Addie's gravestone is incorrect.

Avery
John L. Avery
1867-1922
His Wife
Addie Mahoney
1872-1926 
Avery John Lauren
 
132 JONATHAN (16), b. 9 Dec., 1691, son of Capt. Thomas Avery and l fan irn'h Miner; married 1st, Elizabeth Waterman, 16 April, 1724; 2d, Widow Dorothy (Denison) (Rogeis) Copp. She was daughter of Capt. .Robert Denison, and married 1st, Ebenezer Rogers, and 2d, Dea. David Copp. He settled in Norwich.

Children by Elizabeth.

43. Elizabeth, b. 7 Jan., 1725.
44. Hannah, b.
45. Charles, b. 30 March, 1730.
46. Elisha, b.

Children by Dorothy.

47. Ann, b. 10 July, 1753.
48. Lucy, b. 16 July, 1755.
49. David, b. 27 Dec., 1757. 
Avery Jonathan
 
133 living next dorr to her parents in 1860 (ADV 9/9/2009). Avery Julia Elizabeth
 
134 In 1870 he was living with his grndparents James and Malinda Mitchell (ADV 9/16/09).
In 1880 & 1900 he is living with his uncle Alfred J. Collar and Aunt Annie Mitchell (ADV 9/16/2009).
In 1910 he is living with just his unle Alfred in Mystic (ADV 9/16/09).
His cousin John E. Mitchell is living with him in 1920. I'm not sure who John's parents are. (ADV 9/16/09) 
Avery Leander Adelbert
 
135 1174. Leonard7 Avery (Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher) was b. Dec. 11, 1803; m. Julia C. Bill, dau. of Andrew and Susan (Smith) Bill, later of Delaware County, N.Y. She was b. Aug. 20 1806. They lived for a time in Bozrah. It has been impossible to ascertain the dates of the births of the children or what became of most of them.

Children of Leonard and Julia C. (Bill) Avery;

i. Mary, b. Dec. 1, 1832; died young.
ii. Albert; killed in the battle of Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864.
iii. Elizabeth, m. Dennis W. Payne
iv. Franklin, d. Texas.
v. Frances; m. Layfayette Bixby
Several children died in infancy.
 
Avery Leonard
 
136 iii. Loren Emmett; married; lived at Forest City, Pa.

I am confused, he shows up in the 1850 Census as 3 born in PA.... but in the 1870 census as 19 born in NY (ADV 9/11/2009).

He is living with his uncle charles harding in 1880 (ADV 9/11/09). 
Avery Loren Emmett
 
137 died young. Avery Mary
 
138 1177. Mary H. Aery (Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher); m. Nov. 11, 1823, at Bozrah, Salmon Lothrop Gardner, s. of David and Mary (Lothrop) Gardner. He was b. Dec. 5, 1804, at Montville.

Children of Salmon Lothrop and Mary H. (Avery) Gardner, b. at Bozrah:
i. Mary Lothrop, b. Aug. 6, 1824; d. y.
ii. Seth Lothrop, b. Feb. 1, 1826.
iii. Charles Avery, b. March 9, 1828.

The name of No. 1177 was Mary Ann Avery and not Mary H. In addition to the three children recorded at the top of page 514, she had two others, Philura and Abby Ann, probably born in Pennsylvania. 
Avery Mary Ann
 
139 Mary Ann Avery (Elisha Vibber, Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James Christopher) was b. Sept. 15, 1838, at Bozrah; see Editorial Note on page 830; m. Carlos Lay of Colchester.

Children of Carlos and Mary Ann (Avery) Lay:
i. Addie; m. Forest Leffingwell
 
Avery Mary Ann
 
140 Mary Elizabeth Avery (George Loren, Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher) was b. Oct. 31, 1846; she was the child of George Loren and Lucinda (Harding) Avery as previously recorded;see No. 1176, on page 513, and the Editorial Note on page 831; m. Nov. 12, 1879, Marion DeWitt Giddings, s. of Andrew and Margaret Bowers (Stewart) Giddings. He was b. Jan. 8, 1848, at Herrick, Pa. She d. March 28, 1892, at Herrick. He is living in Herrick Tp., Susquehanna Co., Pa.

Children of Marion and Mary Elizabeth (Avery) Giddings, b. at Herrick:
i. Clinton Marion, b. May 24, 1881.
ii. Celia Leona, b. Aug. 13, 1885
iii. Everett Charles, b. June 27, 1888.

Looks like her mother in law was living with her and her husband during the 1880 census (ADV 9/11/2009). 
Avery Mary Elizabeth
 
141 Myra Louise Avery (Henry Elisha, Elisha Vibber, Oliver, Jonathan, Jonathan, Thomas, James, Christopher) was b. March 17, 1886; m. Sept. 11, 1904, Earl Griswold Morgan, s. of Griswold Henry and JennieEtta Morgan.

Child of Earl Griswold and Myra Louise (Avery) Morgan:
i. Gladys Idella, b. Nov. 24, 1905. 
Avery Myra Louise
 
142 The name of No. 1178, the sixth child of Oliver Avery, was Philura, as recorded on page 319. She m. a Mr. Poole. Avery Philura
 
143 All information from Myheritage.com, none verified yet Check out America Silversmiths

Rebecca, third daughter of James Greenslade; married August 5, 1678, in New London, Mr. William Potts, of New Castle, England, a constable; 
Avery Rebecca
 
144 Detail: Westerly Sun
Date: 6 Dec 1972
Notes:
Actual text: Mrs. Ruth I. (Avery) Prince, 66, wife of Howard E. Prince of 45 MacArthur Blvd., Wakefield, and formerly of Hope Valley, died at South County Hospital, Wakefield, yesterday following a brief illness. Born in Richmond, Feb. 12, 1906, she was a daughter of the late John and Addie (Mahoney) Avery. Surviving in addition to her husband are a daughter, Miss Gloria R. Prince, at home; two sisters, Mrs. Elsie Blacklock of Hope Valley and Mrs. Frances Sidebottom of Ashaway. The funeral service will be held at the Avery Funeral Home, Main St., Hope Valley, Friday at 2 p.m. Burial will be in Pine Grove Cemetery, Hope Valley. There are no calling hours. 
Avery Ruth Irene
 
145 THOMAS (5), b. 6 May, 1651, son of James Avery and Joanna Greenslade; married Hannah Miner, by whom he had five children. After her death he married for second wife Hannah Raymond, b. 8 Aug., 1668, daughter of Joshua Raymond and Elizabeth Smith, by whom he had six children. He settled in the North Parish of New London. His name appears the first on the list of the " first covenanters " in the organization of the church here in 1722. Capt. Thomas Avery was a man of noble qualities, an active Christian, and a respected citizen; his end was peace. He died 5 Jan., 1737, aged 87.

Children by Hannah Miner.

12. Thomas, b. 20 April, 1679; m. Ann Shaply 12 July, 1704.
13. Samuel, b. 15 Nov., 1680; m. Elizabeth Ransford.
14. Ephraim, bap. 18 Oct., 1685.
15. Hannah, bap. 16 April, 1688; m. _____ Minor.
16. Jonathan, b. 9 Dec., 1691; m. 1st, Elizabeth Waterman; 2d, Widow Dorothy Copp.
17. Abraham, bap. 6 March, 1691-2; m. Jane Hill.

Children by Hannah Raymond.

18. Joshua, bap. 25 Aug., 1695; m. Jerusha Rockwell.
19. Elizabeth, b. ; m. Sylvester Baldwin 19 May,1724.
20. Mary, b. ; m. Benjamin Baker.
21. Isaae, b. ; m. Elizabeth Fox.
22. Charles, b. ; died young. 
Avery Thomas
 
146 ii. Urial Wright; married; lived at Uniondale and Tresco, Pa.

living alone and widowed in 1920 (ADV 9/11/2009).
living with son Charles and his wife mary during 1930 census (ADV 9/11/2009). 
Avery Urial Wright
 
147 William L. Avery of Hope Valley Dead at 51
William L. Avery of Hope Valley died at the Rhode island Hospital in Providence yesterday after a short illness. He was born June 6, 1903 in East Haddam, Conn. the son of John L. and Addie (Mahoney) Avery and was a farmer. He leaves four sisters, Mrs. Clifford Andrews, Sr., Mrs. Howard Prince and Mrs. Aubrey Blacklock of Hope Valley, and Mrs. Harry Sidebottom of Bradford. also a half brother, George Boson of Colchester and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the Avery Funeral Home, Hope Valley. Rev. Dudley Bowser, pastor of the Baptist Church will officiate. Internment will be in Pine Grove Cemetery. 
Avery William Loren
 
148 Sarah Ayer, who died September 25, 1797; Ayer Sarah
 
149 went to California in 1852 and was never heard from again. Backus Henry
 
150 John Bacon. d. 1683. Son of Michael. Came to America with his father and settled at Dedham. Made a " freeman " in 1647. Married at Dedham Feb. 17, 1652, Rebecca Hall. He was selectman, etc., at Dedham, and one of the largest ratepayers. A facsimile of his autograph, with those of many others of the early Dedham settlers, may be found in Vol. III. of the published records of Dedham. John Bacon wasa member of Capt. Timothy Dwight's company in King Philip's war. He died at Dedham June 17, 1683. His widow, Rebecca, died at Dedham Oct. 27, 1694.

3. John, admitted a freeman at Dedham, 1647 ; died June 17, 1683.

4. John2 Bacon (Michael1), born probably in England, came to Dedham in 1640, with hie father; was made freeman in 1647; and was sole executor of his father's estate. By his father's will he received "four Acres of Meadow Lying in ffowle Meadow in Dorchester ; all woodlands & swamps granted me by the town of Dedham, excepting that Swampe that Lye one the North [of] Charles River." He was frequently appointed on committees for clearing lands and laying out highways, and is recorded as among the selectmen, 1660-1 ; was a surveyor and commissioner, and one of the signers of the petition of the town of Dedham against the Indians of Natick, sent to the Governor and Assistants and Deputies assembled in General Court at Boston, May 7, 1662. (Mass. Archives, XXX., 112.) He was a member of Captain Timothy Dwight's company, in King Philip's War, stationed at the garrison in Wrentham ia 1676. He left no will. His wife Rebecca, son John, and son-in-law Nathaniel Kingsbury, were appointed administrators of his estate. There is no record of division of the property, but in the inventory " lands and rights in Wrentham " are mentioned. He remained in Dedham until his death, June 17, 1683. He married, December 17, 1651, Rebecca Hall of Dedham, who died October 27, 1694. Until recently, descendants of John enjoyed part of the ancestral property. His children, born in Dedham, were :

10. i. John, b. July 17, bapt. Aug. 3, 1656; d. Oct. 27, 1732.
ii. Rebecca, b. Nov. 10, 1658; m. 13 Feb. 1678, John Gay of Dedham.
11. iii. Daniel, b. March 10, 1660-1; d. before April 21, 1700. iv. Sarah, b. March 81, 1663.
12. v. Samukl, b. Oct. 8, 1665.
13. vi. Thomas, b. Aug. 23, 1667; d. in Wrentham, April 11, 1749. vil. Susanna, m. Jan. 7, 1692, Jonathan Dewing.
viii. Mary, b. Oct. 14, 1673; m. Nathaniel Kingsbury.
ix. Stephen, b. Aug. 21, 1677; m. Mary _____, and had: Mary,4 b. March 20, _____ (probably 1707-8). No further record in Dedham.

(II) John Bacon, son of Michael BACON Bacon (l), was born probably in England, and came to Dedham with his father in 1640. He was admitted a freeman in 1647 and was sole executor of his father's estate. By his father's will he received four acres of meadow lying in Fowle Meadow in Dorchester; ''all woodlands and swamps granted me by the town of Dedham," excepting that swamp on the north of Charles river. He was frequently appointed on committees for clearing lands and laying out highways, and was selectman 1660-61 ; was surveyor and commissioner ; one of the signers of the petition of the town of Dedham against the Indians of Natick, sent to the governor and assistants and deputies assembled in general court, May 7, 1662 (Massachusetts Archives,. XXX, 112). He was a member of Captain Timothy Dwight's company in King Philip's war, stationed at the garrison in Wrentham- in 1676. He left no will. His wife Rebecca, son John and son-in-law, Nathaniel Kingsbury, were appointed administrators of the estate. There is no record of division of the property, but in the inventory "lands and rights in Wrentham" are mentioned. He resided in Dedham until his death, June 17, 1683. He married, December 17, 1651, Rebecca Hall, of Dedham, who died October 27, 1694. Until recently, descendants of John Bacon enjoyed part of the ancestral estate. Children, born in Dedham: i. John, born July 17, baptized August 3, 1656; died October 27, 1832. 2. Rebecca, born November Id. 1658, married, February 13, 1678, John Gay, of Dedham. 3. Daniel, born March 10. 1660-61, died before April 21, 1700. 4. Sarah, born March 31, 1663. 5. Samuel, born October 8, 1665. 6. Thomas, born August 23, 1667, died in Wrentham, April n, 1749. 7. Susanna, married, January 7, 1692, Jonathan Dewing. 8. Mary, born October 14, 1673, married Nathaniel Kingsbury. 9. Stephen, born August 21, 1677, mentioned below. 
Bacon John
 
151 Mary Bacon. b. 1708. Daughter of Stephen. Born at Needham March 20, 1708. Married at Needham May 15, 1728, Ebenezer Felch. Probably died in Annapolis co., N. S., after 1770. She was a sister of Lieut. John Bacon who married Abigail Sawin, granddaughter of Thomas Sawin, the first white settler at Natick. Lieut. Bacon was one of the Natick men who went to Annapolis, N. S., in the campaign against the French of 1745-48. He went forth with the patriots on the momentous day of Lexington and was killed in the fighting of April 19, 1775. A monument in memory of him and four others who fell on that day, on the Colonial side, was erected in the burial ground at Needham in 1851. He had as many as six sons who served in the Revolutionary war. In the official lists of Massachusetts soldiers and sailors of the Revolution are 271 Bacon names. Bacon Mary
 
152 Michael Bacon. d. 1648. Was one of the very small number of the early settlers who came from Ireland. The Irish immigration increased at a later date. He is said to have been born in England and to have gone to the north of Ireland about seven years before his emigration to America. He brought wife and children with him and settled at Dedham in 1640. He signed the church covenant at Dedham. His wife, Alice, was admitted to the church Sept. 17, 1641, and died April 2, 1648. Michael died April 18, 1648. He had children : Michael, Daniel, John, Sarah and Alice, who married at Dedham March 31, 1647, Lieut. Thomas Bancroft.* She died at Dedham March 29, 1648.

Bacon is the name of an ancient seigniory in Normandy and from this place the Norman ancestors in England took their name, nearly a thousand years ago. According to the genealogy of the great Suffolkfamily of Bacon, one GrimaM or Grimaldus, a relative of the Norman chieftain. William de Warenne, came to England at the time of the Conquest and settled near Holt in Suffolk. His great-grandson tookthe name Bacon, or rather resumed the use of the place-name as a surname. In the north of France the surname Bacon is still in use. William Bacon in 1082 endowed the Abbey of Holy Trinity at Caen. The surname Bacon is found in the Battle Rolls in England in the eleventh century and in the Hundred Rolls in the thirteenth. There are occasional variations in spelling, such as Bacun and Bachun, and in some instances the surname Bacon may have been corrupted from Beacon. From their connection with Baveux the Bacons were sometimes Latinized De Bajocis. Sir William Bacon of the knights bearing banners in the reign of Philip III in France, bore arms—a beech tree.

Grimaldus, mentioned above, had three sons: 1. Radulph. 2. Edmund, took the name of his abode for his surname. 3. Ranulph or Ralph was known as Ralph de Bacons-thorp (thorp means village) ; his son Roger de Bacons- thorp was father of Robert Bacon who assumed the name without the particle implying location, and the name has continued in various lines of descent. George, son of Ralph de Baconsthorp, was father of Roger Bacon who released to his sister Agnes lands belonging to the family in Normandy, and from him for many generations descended the Bacons of Drinkstone and Hessett in county Suffolk. The lineage to Nathaniel Bacon, of Virginia, the famous "Rebel" of early colonial days, has been traced. Michael Bacon, the immigrant ancestor of most of the Massachusetts families, was born in Suffolk, removing to Ireland and thence to Dedham, Massachusetts. The Bacon family at Hessett bears these arms : Argent on a fesse engrailed between three escutcheons gules, three millets or. Richard Bacon (7), whose lineage is Reginald (6), Robert (5), Roger (4), George (3), Ralph (2), Grimaldus (1), was the first to bear the arms of his family : Gules of a chief argent two mullets sable.

The original seat of the family was in Suffolk near Ipswich, perhaps Barham, but families of importance of this name have lived and been numerous in Durham, Hampshire, Norfolk, Somerset, York, and other counties. George Bacon, Esq.. of Nottingham family, living at Sutton Bomington, had arms : Vert a cross engraved ermine a chief argent thereon a ducal coronet gules between three millets sable. Crest—a mount vert thereon a boar argent bristled and tusked or semee of mullets sable in the mouth a ragged staff vert. Motto: Mediocria firma.

(I) Michael Bacon, immigrant ancestor mentioned above, was born about 1575, probably in county Suffolk, England. He went from England to the north of Ireland in 1633 and seven years later came to NewEngland with Samuel Cooke and John Smyth, also from the province of Ulster, Ireland. They were proposed as proprietors of the town of Dedham, Massachusetts, May 23, 1640, and the records show that itwas "agreed upon that the Towne of Dedham shall entertain Mr. Saml. Cooke, together with his estate and also Mr. Smith and Mr. Bacon all from Ireland, and afford to them such accomodation of upland meadow as their estates shall require." From a record made the next month it would appear that the wife of Bacon preceded him. He signed the famous Dedham church covenant. His wife was admitted to the church September 17, 1641. She died April 2, 1648. In 1644 he gave of his land to the town for one of the highways (See page 364, Gen. Reg. 1902). He died April 18. 1648, the same month as his wife. His will was dated four days earner and it mentions all his children except Alice, who died the month previous. The inventory was dated April 20, 1649, and the estate amounted to nearly fifty-five pounds.

Some writers state that William Bacon, of Salem, was a brother ; he also was an Englishman born, who lived in Ireland in Dublin in 1639; his wife Rebecca was sister of Humphrey Potter, who was slain in a massacre in Ireland, and daughter of Thomas Potter, some time mayor of Coventry, England. Children of Michael Bacon: 1. Michael, Jr., born in England in 1608, mentioned below. 2. Daniel, of Woburn in 1640; of Bridgewater 1664; of Cambridge Village or Newton 1669; admitted a freeman May 26, 1647. 3. John, admitted a freeman at Dedham, 1647 ; died June 17, 1683. 4. Alice, married, March 31, 1647, Thomas Bancroft, who died March 24, 1648; she died March 29, 1648. 5. Sarah, married, April 14, 1648, Anthony Hubbard. of Dedham ; died 1652.

MICHAEL BACON AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

By Leon Bbooks Bacon, LL.B., of New York City.

1. MICHAEL1 Bacon, born probably in County Suffolk, England, came to America in 1640, and was one of the early settlers of Dedham, Mass. Tradition says he held the office of captain of a company of yeomanry in County Suffolk.* According to Brown's History of Bedford, Mass, (appendix, page 2), he went from England to the North of Ireland about 1633, seven years previous to his coming to New England. The following is taken from "Dedham Records, Town and Selectmen," \rol. III., page 68: [26 May, 1640.] "Agreed upon that the Towne of Dedham shall euterteyne mr Samuell Cooke together wth his estate And also mr Smith & mr Bacon all from Ireland & afford to them such accomodacons of vpland & medowe as their estates shall Requier."

From a record made the following month (ibid, page 69), it would appear that the wife of Mr. Bacon preceded him in Dedham. He was one of the signers of the church covenant of Dedham. In 1644, he granted land to the town for one of the highways. His wife Alice died April 2, 1648, and he died the same month, April 18, 1648. His will, dated April 14, 1648, mentions all his children, except Alice, who died the previous month. Inventory, April 20, 1649, amounted to £54. 15. 04. (See RegIster, Vol. 7, pages 230-1.)

His children, born probably in England, were :

2. i. MICHAEL2; Charlestown, 1640, Woburn, 1641, Blllerica, about 1678; d. July 4, 1688.
3. ii. Daniel; Woburu, 1640, Bridgewater, 1664, Cambridge Village (now Newton), about 1669; freeman, May 26, 1647; d. Sept. 7, 1691.
4. iii. John; Dedham; freeman, 1647; d. June 17, 1683.
iv. Alice, m. March 31, 1647, Thomas Bancroft of Dedham. He d. March 24, 1648. She d. March 29, 1648.
v. Sarah, m. April 14, 1648, Anthony Hubbard of Dedham. She d. 1652. 
Bacon Michael
 
153 Stephen Bacon. 1677-1766. Son of John. Born at Ded- ham Aug. 21, 1677. Married Jan. 6, 1704, at Sudbury, where his first child was born, Mary, daughter of John Loker. He built a house in Needham in 1705 and there settled. This house is now, or was recently, standing. In 1719 he was one of a committee of three appointed to run the boundary line between Needham and Natick. His name appears upon Needham records in 1740 in connection with a highway through his lands. He died at Needham in 1766. His son, Stephen, died in Digby, Nova Scotia, in 1804, 33. 91. He had two other sons who lived to over 90. His older brother, Samuel, also settled in Needham and died there Nov. 26, 1743.

ix. Stephen, b. Aug. 21, 1677; m. Mary _____, and had: Mary,4 b. March 20, _____ (probably 1707-8). No further record in Dedham.

(III) Stephen Bacon, son of John Bacon (2), was born in Dedham, Massachusetts, August 2i, 1677. Married Mary Loker, March 20, 1707-8; children: I. Mary, bom March 20, 1708-9. 2. Lieutenant John, bornMay 30, 1721, mentioned below. Several others. 
Bacon Stephen
 
154 John R. Vibber has her listed as being born 1813 in Canada but the 1850 census indicates ~1818 in Canada (ADV 10/5/09). Badger Christina
 
155 His step-father Sylvester Vibber was living with him and his wife during the 1870 Census (ADV 10/11/09). Badgrow Francis
 
156 Saturday, Oct 27, 1945 Traverse City Record Eagle page 3
Describes Nagasaki
Letters from Pfc Dallas Bailey to his wife, the former Achsa Kinney of this city, now in Winc hester Indiana and from her brother S2C Donald Kinney, son of Mrs W. A. Kinney, south Union S treet, appeared in a recent issue of the Winchester paper describing their stations. Pfc Bail ey is stationed in Nagasaki, the first Japanese city to be hit by the atomic bomb, and seama n Kinney is on Guam. PfcBailey said in part:
"We are now about two miles from where the atomic bomb was dropped. Of course, one cannot ent er that area and it cannot be cleaned out. The stench at night is sickening, rotting bodies , burning buildings and animals, all together. A few bodies have floated down the river, bloa ted beyond all description. I don't believe these people thought there were as many ships an d trucks in the world as they have seen since Sunday. Although poor, they seem amazed at th e treatment they are getting.They are very willing to work and some of them are very strong d espite the fact that most of them are less than 5 feet in height."
Note: Dallas received his promotion to Corporal 22Sept 45, so this would have been written be fore then.

6-8-1944 to 5-7-1946 Active Duty USMC

2/3/2005 Received 50 year membership award from F&AM Lodge #56, Winchester, Indiana. At th e same time, the same award was presented to his 3rd cousin once removed: Donald Kelly Smiths on.

http://orig.thestarpress.com/articles/1/055071-5761-010.html
printed Tuesday, November 21, 2006
Dallas Bailey, 88
WINCHESTER - Dallas Bailey, 88, passed away Monday, November 20, 2006.
Dallas was a veteran of WWII.
Funeral services will beheld at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday at Thayer Funeral Home in Winchester w ith visitation from 3-6 p.m

Obit from the Winchester News Gazette (revised version printed page 2, Wednesday, November 2 2, 2006.)

Dallas Bailey 88
Dallas Bailey, 88, Winchester, died Monday, Nov 20, 2006 at Randolph Nursing Home.
He was born October 4, 1918 in Winchester to the late Daniel W and Ida Mae (Laisure) Bailey . A corporal in the US Marine Corp, he was a veteran of World War II. A graduate of Wincheste r High School, he attended Earlham College. He worked for 30 years in sales in the glass indu stry and 16 years in sales in the forging industry, retiring from Teledyne in Portland (IN) . He was past master of Winchester Masonic Lodge #56, from which he received his 50 year Awar d of Gold.(2-3-2005) He was past exalted ruler and life member of Elks Lodge #1534, past comm ander and life member of American Legion Post # 39, life member of the Scottish Rite in Ft. W ayne. A birthright Quaker, he held various offices in the Friends Church. He was a member o f the Royal Order of Scotland and Mizpah Shrine.
He was preceded in death by his first wife, Achsa (Kinney) Bailey, one brother Paul Bailey, a nd a sister, Delight Jones. (Also by an infant sister, Lucille)
Survivors include his wife of 26 years, Winchester, a daughter, four grandchildren and 10 gre at-grandchildren.
The funeral will be held at 7 pm Wednesday, November 22 at Thayer Funeral Home in Wincheste r with Pastor Ron Ferguson officiating. Burial will be at the convenience of the family. Vis itation is 3 to 6 pm Wednesday. An Elks Lodge of Sorrow will be held at 6 pm Wednesday an d a Masonic Lodge of Sorrow at 6:30 pm.
Memorial contributions may be given to the Friends Church of Winchester with envelopes at th e funeral home.

Dallas' will written Aug 2005, admitted to probate 12-11-2006
Item I It is my will that as soon as convenient after my demise that all my just debts, inclu ding the expenses of my last sickness and burial, and administration expenses, be first pai d.
Item II I give and bequeath the following items of personal property to my daughter,
(a)Baby picture and 1918 coing "picture"
(b) Crystal glassware
(c) History of Randolph County contained in two (2) books
(d) County (sic) Doctor picture
In the event of the demise of (daughter) prior to my demise, I give and bequeath th above per sonal property to my wife Mary Ellen Parker Bailey.

Item III I give and bequeath my household goods and effects to my wife, Mary Ellen Parker Bai ley. In the event of the demise of my wife, Mary Ellen Parker Bailey, prior to my demise, I g ive and bequeath my household good and effects to my daughter. In the event of the demise o f my wife, Mary Ellen Parker Bailey, prior to my demise, and in the event of th demise of m y daughter, prior to my demise, I direct my Personal Representative to sell said household go ods and effects and to distribute the proceeds derived therefrom pursuant to Item V.

ItemIV I give and bequeath to my wife, Mary Ellen Parker Bailey, all certificates of stock wh ich I may own at the time of my demise. In the event of the demise of Mary Ellen Parker Baile y prior to my demise, I direct my Personal Representative to liquidate said stock and to dist ribute the proceeds derived from said sale pursuant to Item V.

ItemV After compliance with Items I through IV, I give devise and bequeath the rest and resid ue of my property as follows:
(a) Seventy-five (75%) percent of the rest and residue of my property, I give and bequeath t o my duaghter. In the event of teh demise of my daughter, prior to my demise, I direct the s hare she would inherit under this Item V be distributed as follows:
(1) Twenty-five (25%) of the share which (daughter named) would inherit under this Item Vif l iving shall be distributed to my following named grandchildren who survive me, namely (named) , share andshare alike.
(2) Seventy-five (75%) of the share which (daughter) would inherit under this Item V if livin g shall be distributed to the Winchester Friends Church to be used by said Church only for Ch urch property, maintenance or replacement or to the scholarship fund if said fund is in exist ence at the time of my demise. The divisions of any funds received by said Church pursuant t o this Item V between Church property, maintenance or replacement and the scholarship fund sh all be at the sole determination of the governing officials of said Church.

Mentions Winchester Lodge No 56 F.& A. M. as contingent

Names Mary Ellen Parker Bailey as Personal Representative and if she cannot serve, names Robe rt A. Parker. Estate to be administered without court supervision.

Signed August 22, 2005 
Bailey Orman Dallas
 
157 Unmarried Baker Abby
 
158 Unmarried Baker Annie
 
159 Elizabeth Barber, d. 1652. Daughter of Sichard. Born in England. Married in Eng. Henry Brock. " The wife of good- man Brocke " was received into the church at Dedham March 29, 1640. She died at Dedham in 1652—the same year as her husband. Barber Elizabeth
 
160 Richard Barber, d. 1644. Born in England, probably about 1575. Proprietor at Dedham in 1638. His wife, Elizabeth, died at Dedham Feb. 20, 1643. He died at Dedham June 18,1644.

The first bequest in his will is that of a cow, which he had received as a free gift from London, to the deacons of the church at Dedham for " the use and benefit of the poor in Dedham." He left his house, lands, etc., in Dedham to his executors, Henry Brock and John Brock, son of Henry. 
Barber Richard
 
161 He has two other children Raymond L and Clara L. listed int he 1920 Census. I am unsure if the mother was Katherine even though their mother is recorded as having been born in Ohio. (ADV 9/25/09). Barfield Lloyd Cleveland
 
162 Noah W. Barfield was a First Sargeant in the Army during World War II. He is listed as missing in action on 14 February 1945 during the Battle of the Bulge. Noah was awarded the Purple Heart and a Bronze Star. From Belgium he was awarded a Croix de Guerre, with Palm. Barfield Noah Wilson
 
163 Here middle initial is well documented as E., but i recently found it listed as Elizabeth on a myheritage.com site by Gail Tyson. (9/28/2008)

2.) Caroline E., born Aug. 16, 1823, married Levi Lincoln Flagg, and settled in Boylston, where she died July 2, 1871, aged 49 years. Mr. Flagg has been much employed in town affairs, and is one of the most influential and respected citizens of Boylston. He has served many years as Selectman, Assessor, Town Treasurer, &c., and represented the town in the General Court. They have had eight children, all of whom are now living. 
Barnes Caroline Elizabeth
 
164 Daniel Barnes, David, Fortunatus, m. Betsey Longley of Boylston June 13, 1821. He remained on the homestead of his father. Had Mary Sophia, b. June 12, 1822, m. Oliver Carter; Caroline E., b. Aug. 16, 1823, m. Levi L. Flagg of Boylston; Israel L., b. May 19, 1825; Angenette, b. Dec. 10, 1826, m. Levi Brigham of Boylston; James W., b. July 1, 1830, d. Dec. 28, 1830; Rhoena, b. Oct. 21, 1828, m. Charles Whitcomb of Bolton ; George Henry, b. Dec. 18, 1831; Harriet J., b. Aug. 10, 1833, m. Samuel H. Hastings, res., Worcester; James W..b. May 15, 1835, d. 1840; Asenath.b. July 25, 1839, m. John F.Bartlett, res., Boylston; Martha, b. March 30, 1837; David, b. Oct. 19, 1843, m. Miranda Parker, res., Shrewsbury; child, Daniel Webster, b. June 6, 1841, d. May 21, 1848. He d. Nov. 6, 1854; wid. d.Sept. 13, 1881, at 82 ; she left more than seventy descendants. Barnes Daniel
 
165 David Barnes, Fortunatus, m. Asenath Moore May 4, 1790. He lived on a part of the homestead, the same now owned by George H. Barnes; built the old red house now standing on the premises. Had Welcome,b. Aug. 15, 1793 ; Daniel, b. Jan. 24, 1795 ; David, b. Dec. 25, 1800, m. Submit Willard of Boylston, res. in Barre; Asenath, b. Sept. 13, 1802, m. Jonathan Fawcett of Northboro; John, b. Oct. n, 1805, m. Patience Harlow of Shrewsbury. He d. May 9, 1837; she d. May 26, 1847. Barnes David
 
166 Fortunatus Barnes, s. of Jonathan of Marlboro, b. Sept. 25, 1738, m. Persis Hosmer of Concord Oct. 18, 1764; settled on Barnes hill. Had David, b. Aug. 27, 1765; Lydia, b. July 20. 1767, m. Amherst Howe; William, b. April 5, 1773; Persis, b. May 5. 1779, m. Silas Priest; m., 2d, Peltiah Jones. He d. Nov. 9, 1807; wid. d. Sept. 16, 1821.

Fortunatus Barnes, the first of the name here, was a descendant of Thomas Barnes, who came over in ______________________________ she became his wife a year later. The records do not say whether theymade love on the way. The line of descent is through John and Jonathan to Fortunatus, great grandson of Thomas. (A sister of Fortunatus m. Solomon Bowker, who once owned the Joseph Priest place.) Tradition holds that Mr. Barnes held a claim on our Phineas Howe estate, on which cattle were kept and fed in racks on "Rack meadow." (He bought eighty acres of the Howe farm, eighty acres of the Lancaster proprietors and 119 acres of John Hudson, and some more of John Fry.) This extensive ownership determined the name of "Barnes hill." South of the present homestead was an old house occupied by the Goodnows. Daniel Goodnow's tax was abated in 1787. Further on up the hill lived a Dafford family and also a Foster family. John Hudson was on top of the hill ( he was grandfather of Hon. Charles Hudson). The Barnes purchase included the most of these. "Barnes hill" gives a view of Wachusett seldom equaled. The centennial of the homestead was impressively observed in 1866. A generous collation was prepared by the family under the beautiful arbor of maples which adorn the home and the town. Hon. Charles Hudson made an interesting address. Many sentiments were offered and responded to by citizensand guests. These maples were planted by Artemas Barnes.

(IV) Fortunatus. third child and son of Jonathan and Rachel Barnes, was born in Marlboro. September 25, 17.18. When a young man he went to reside in Berlin, Massachusetts, settling in the locality which has ever since been known as Barnes Hill, and was a prosperous farmer of that town during the remainder of his life, which terminated November 9, 1807. For his first wife he married Persis Hosmer,of Concord. Massachusetts, born April 19. 1739, and his second wife was Peletiah Jones. She survived him and died September 16, 1821. His children, all of his first union, were: David, born August 27, 1765; Lydia, born July 20, 1767, became the wife of Amherst Bailey; Hannah, born June 20, 1770. married Ephraim Howe; and Captain William, who is referred to at length in the succeeding paragraph. 
Barnes Fortunatus
 
167 (II) Deacon John, third child and second son of Thomas, senior, and Abigail (Goodnow) Barnes, was born in Marlboro, December 25, 1666. He was a lifelong resident of Marlboro and participated activelyin the early religious progress of that locality, having served as a deacon of the church during the pastorate of the Rev. Mr. Beck. His death occurred April 5. 1752. The maiden name of his wife was Hannah Howe, and she died November 8, 1742, aged sixty-six years. Their children were: Abigail, born October 5, 1695, married Joseph Morse ; Dorothy, born March 24, 1698, married James Woods ; Daniel,born April 2, 1701, married Zerumiah Eager; Jonathan, who will be again referred to; David, born June 24, 1708, died May 9, 1720; Hannah, born February 17, 1712, became the wife of Andrew Rice ; and John, born March 23, 1716, married Elizabeth Cranston. Barnes John
 
168 (III) Jonathan, fourth child and second son of Deacon John and Hannah (Howe) Barnes, was born in Marlboro, November 26, 1703. He attained the ripe old age of nearly eighty years, and died in Marlboro. October 10, 1783. The Christian name of his wife, whom he married prior to 1735, was Rachel, and she survived her husband but a short time, her death having occurred January 20, 1784. She was the mother of nine children : Silas, born January 21, 1735, married Betty Bigclow : Elisha, born October 28, 1736, died June 7, 1740; Fortunatus. the date of whose birth will be recorded presently; Rachel, born July 13, 1740. became the wife of John Warren, Jr. ; Lucy, born July 7, 1742, married Joseph Hosmer ; Dorothy, born December 18, 1747. became the wife of Solomon Bmvker; Jonathan, born November 6, 1749, died August 5. 1785; David, born September 21, 1751, died January 28, 7756: and William, born March 21, 1753, married Sarah Merriam. Barnes Jonathan
 
169 For considerable more than two hundred and fifty years the name of Barnes has existed as a patronymic in America, taking root in New England early in the Colonial period and gradually distributing itself throughout the entire country. It is to be found in the Revolutionary rolls, also in those of the second war with Great Britain (1812-15) and in the more recent civil strife, which for a time threatened to divide the Union into two integral parts. In civil life several of this name have won distinction as clergymen and writers. All of its bearers are of English descent and the origin of the name in the mother country is enveloped within the impenetrable mists of antiquity. The line of descent, on this side of the ocean, of the late Captain William M. Barnes, of Nashua, is as follows:

(I) Among the passengers in the "Speedwell," which arrived at Boston from England in May, 1636, was Thomas Barnes, an honest, industrious yeoman, a non-conformist and, above all, a young man of sufficient courage and energy to render excellent service in transplanting European civilization into the western hemisphere. His whereabouts for a number of years subsequent to his landing has not as yet come to light, but the records of Marlboro show conclusively that he was one of the early settlers in that town, as he purchased real estate there at least three years prior to its incorporation (1666), and he resided there for the remainder of his life, which terminated in 1679. He married Abigail Goodnow, daughter of Thomas Goodnow. of Sudbury, who became one of the original proprietors of Marlboro, and it is quite probable that 'Thomas Barnes went there from Sudbury, as did most of its pioneer settlers. He was the father of six children : Thomas, Dorothy, John, William, Abigail and Susanna. 
Barnes Thomas
 
170 (II) Ensign Daniel Bartlett, son of Henry Bartlett (1), was born in Marlboro, Massachusetts, April 10, 1691. He died there May 1, 1764. Most if not all the descendants of Henry Bartlett, the immigrant, are also descended through his son, Daniel Bartlett. He settled in Marlboro and had a large family, eight or more of his sons and daughters settling in Worcester county and raising families there. Daniel was ensign in the Marlboro company. He died May, 1764. He was a prominent man in the town of Marlboro. He married there, February 12, 1/17, Martha How, the daughter of Elcazer and Hannah (How) How, of whom a sketch appears elsewhere in this work.

The children of Ensign Daniel and Martha (How) Bartlett were: Jotham, born in Marlboro, April 5. 1717, settled in Westboro, married Miriam How; Sarah. June 30, 1718, settled at Rutland, married (intentions dated at Rutland November 10, 1750), Daniel Saunders; Damel, September 28, 1719, settled at Rutland and has many descendants thereabouts; wife Mary died at Rutland, June 12, 1825, aged ninety-five years, the oldest person in the town; he died there December 17, 1801, aged eighty-three years; Joseph, November 24, 1720, settled at Westboro, married (intentions at Westboro May 24, 1745) at Shrewsbury, February 5, 1745; Abigail, October 30, 1721, married, August 25, 1756, at Marlboro; Abraham, September 21, 1722, died February 11, 1723; John, November 25, 1724, of whom later; Jonathan, January 26, 1725, married, 1753, Mary Holloway, settled at Northboro, and Westboro; Isaac, March 6, 1725, married Martha , settled at Rutland: Abner (twin), March 12, 1728; Mary (twin), March 12, 1728, died young; Jonas, March 31, 1729, married Elizabeth and settled at Marlboro; Mercy, May 31. 1730, married, June 13, 1765. George Oak, of Westboro. 
Bartlett Daniel
 
171 BARTLETT FAMILY. Henry Bartlett (1), the immigrant ancestor of the Bartlett family of Leominster, Massachusetts, was born in England about 1660. He settled in Marlboro, Massachusetts, after King Philip's war, in that part of the town subsequently set off as Northboro. The original homestead was owned lately by William A. Bartlett, of Northboro. From Henry Bartlett came, not only the family of Leominster under consideration, but nearly all of this name in Westboro, Southboro, Sterling, Princeton, Rutland and Northboro, as will be indicated in this sketch. The Brookt'1eld Bartletts are descended mainly from John Bartlett, the pioneer at Windsor, Connecticut. An important branch of the Bartlett family in Worcester is descended from the immigrant, John Bartlett, of Weymouth, Massachusetts, and Cumberland, Rhode Island. Savage is the authority for the service of Henry Bartlett in' King Philip's war under the brave Captain Johnson. Bartlett was probably at Braintree for a short time. The children of Henry and Mary Bartlett, all born at Marlboro, were: Elizabeth, February 27, 1686, married, December 9, 1710, John Prentice; Daniel, April 10, 1691, of whom later; Mary, October 20, 1693; Henry, October 22, 1696, died 1699; Henry and Martha (twins), August 29, 1701; Lydia, August 17, 1704, died December 15, 1722. Bartlett Henry
 
172 found birth record at http://www.ma-vitalrecords.org/MA/Worcester/Northborough/BirthsB.shtml Bartlett Molly
 
173 His parents and himself are all listed as being born in Massachusetts. Bassett Ernest B.
 
174 Ann Batt, daughter of Nicholas Batt, and Lucy _____, married, June 13, 1653, John Webster, of Newbury, Mass.

Nicholas Batt and family came to New England on the ship James, from Southampton, England, April 5, 1635; they settled at Newbury, Mass. He was a linen weaver. The Newbury pioneers were interwoven inblood with many of their neighbors of Oldtown and Rowley, Mass.

John Webster came from Ipswich, Suffolk County, England, to Ipswich, Mass., where he was made freeman in 1635. He died soon after coming here, leaving four sons and four daughters. His wife's name was Mary. Their children:

JOHN2 b. 1633; m. Anna Batt.
Thomas.
Mary m. John Emery.
Hannah m. Michael Emerson.
Stephen b. 1639; m. Hannah Ayer; moved to Haverhill, Mass.
Eliza.
Abigal.
Israel b. 1644; m. Elisabeth Brown (2) Elisabeth Lunt.
Nathan b. 1646; m. Mary . 
Batt Ann
 
175 Ann Batt, daughter of Nicholas Batt, and Lucy _____, married, June 13, 1653, John Webster, of Newbury, Mass.

Nicholas Batt and family came to New England on the ship James, from Southampton, England, April 5, 1635; they settled at Newbury, Mass. He was a linen weaver. The Newbury pioneers were interwoven inblood with many of their neighbors of Oldtown and Rowley, Mass.

John Webster came from Ipswich, Suffolk County, England, to Ipswich, Mass., where he was made freeman in 1635. He died soon after coming here, leaving four sons and four daughters. His wife's name was Mary. Their children:

JOHN2 b. 1633; m. Anna Batt.
Thomas.
Mary m. John Emery.
Hannah m. Michael Emerson.
Stephen b. 1639; m. Hannah Ayer; moved to Haverhill, Mass.
Eliza.
Abigal.
Israel b. 1644; m. Elisabeth Brown (2) Elisabeth Lunt.
Nathan b. 1646; m. Mary . 
Batt Nicholas
 
176 Children:

John E. Bay
Ann Bay
Hugh Bay
James H. Bay
Rebecca Bay
Andrew Bay
Elizabeth Bay
Margaret Bay
Jane Bay
William Bay
Mary Bay
Emeline Bay
Rebecca Susannah Bay 
Bay Nathan
 
177 Jeremiah Beal. 1631-1716. Son of John. Born in England in 1631. Married Nov. 18, 1652, Sarah, daughter of William Blpley. He was Lieutenant in militia, selectman and Representative from Hingham for several years. Died Aug. 10, 1716. Beal Jeremiah
 
178 Nothing verified Beckwith Elizabeth
 
179 Nothing verified Beckwith Matthew
 
180 Nothing verified yet. Beckwith Matthew
 
181 found on ancestry.com (ADV 10/23/09).

NKHeidger (View posts) Posted: 25 Jun 2004 5:28PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames:
Here is the obit that was originally posted online for Gertrude:

Mrs. Gertrude Vibber - 10/02/01 - Vibber, Mrs. Gertrude S., Zilwaukee, Michigan. Passed away early Monday, October 1, 2001, at Covenant Medical Center-Cooper. Age 90 years. Gertrude S. Behrens was born April 21, 1911 in Zilwaukee, the daughter of the late Fredericka (Vierke) and Frederick Behrens. She married Howard W. Vibber September 23, 1950; he predeceased her April 20, 1991. She had been employed by Robertson's Laundry Service for several years. She was a member of St. John Ev. Lutheran Church, Zilwaukee. She enjoyed reading, sewing, embroidery and making quilts. Surviving are her daughter and son-in-law, Beverly J. and Edwin J. Ruppel, with whom she made her home; two grandsons, Steven and his wife Sonya Ruppel and their daughters, Stephanie, Sydney and Serena, all of Alpharetta, Georgia; and Rick J. Ruppel, Zilwaukee. She was predeceased by one grandson, Mark Ruppel and by two brothers, John and William Behrens. Funeral service will take place 1:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 3, 2001 at the W.L. Case & Company Funeral Chapel, 4480 Mackinaw Rd. Rev. Kevin Salzwedel will officiate with burial in Forest Lawn Cemetery. Friends may call at the chapel, 4480 Mackinaw Rd. from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday. Those planning an expression of sympathy may wish to consider St. John Ev. Lutheran Church, Zilwaukee or a favorite charity.

The Saginaw Library also has other obits listed at:

http://obits.netsource-one.net/

Follow the link at the bottom of those pages to the library (if you don't live in Saginaw) and you can request a copy of the obits from them - they generally ask for a small donation to cover thier costs.

Blessing
 
Behrens Gertrude S.
 
182 All information taken from myheritage.com sites, not verified Bent Elizabeth
 
183 (III) John Bent, third child of Robert Bent (2), was born in Penton-Grafton, England, November, 1596. He was forty-two years old when he emigrated to New England. He married, in England. 1624, Martha_____, who died in Sudbury. Massachusetts. May 15. 1679. He brought his wife and five children with him when he sailed from Southampton, April, 1638. in the ship "Confidence," John Johnson, master. His house lot in Sudbury, where he settled, was about a quarter mile "north of the present railroad station in Wayland, and an equal distance from the Sudbury river. He had many other grants of land. He was admitted a freeman, 1640; was selectman, 1641; on a town committee to assign timber land, 1648. He served on the committee that laid out the highway from Weston to the Dunster farm, on the edge of Framingham. This road followed the ancient Indian trail from the sea coast to the Connecticut river. He was one of Major Simon Willard's troopers at Ded- ham in 1654. In 1656 he was one of the petitioners for the grant at Marlboro, but seems not to have lived there. His first five children were born in England, and the two others in Sudbury, Massa chusetts. He was a magistrate, and a man who was often honored, and universally trusted and esteemed. He died September 27. 1672. Children of John and Martha Bent: I. Robert, baptized January 10, 1625; William, baptized October 24, 1626; Peter, baptized April 24, 1629; Agnes, baptized about 1631; John, baptized January 24, 1636; Joseph, born May 16, 1641; Martha, born about 1643. Bent John
 
184 BENT FAMILY. The English ancestors of Charles O. and Rpderic L. Bent, of Gardner, Massachusetts, lived in the town of Penton-Grafton, Hampshire, England, a town seventy miles southwest of London. Theparish is Weyhill.

(I) John Bent is the first Englishman to whom the ancestry is traced. He lived in Penton-Grafton, and died there in 1588. His widow Edith died there in 1601. Their children: Edith, baptized September16, 1564; Robert, see forward; David, baptized October 13, 1568; Maria, baptized January 13, 1672 died young; Joan, baptized November 12. 1574; Richard, baptized February 5, 1577; Alice, baptized June 7. 1579; Agnes, baptized February 27, 1582. 
Bent John
 
185 Martha, the youngest child of John Bent, married in 1663 Samuel Howe. Her son, David, was first proprietor of the Red Horse Tavern at Sudbury. David Howe's son, Ezekiel, grandson,. Adam, and great-grandson, Lyman, (died 1861), were successive proprietors of this old tavern, which was made famous by Longfellow under the name of "The Wayside Inn." It was Lyman. Howe to whom Longfellow's poem refersas

A man of ancient pedigree,
A Justice of the Peace was be,
Known in all Sudbury as " The Squire."

Martha Bent (John) was born in Sudbury, Mass., about 1643, and died Aug. 29, 1680; married, June 5 1663, Samuel How, carpenter, born Oct. 20, 1642, son of John How, one of the first settlers of Sudbury. John afterward moved to Marlboro, where he opened the first public house in the place, but Samuel remained in Sudbury, where he died, April 13, 1713. He married again, Sept. 18, 1685, Mrs. Sarah (Leavitt) Clapp, widow of Nehemiah Clapp of Hingham. David, the youngest son by the first marriage, was the first proprietor of Red Horse Tavern, the "Wayside Inn" made famous by Longfellow. The old hostelry is in the southwest corner of the town, near the boundaries of both Marlboro and Framingham, and was probably built about 1702, though some think at an earlier date. The Hows were a race of tavern-keepers. John's grandson, Capt. Daniel Howe (1681-1768), was one of the first settlers of Shrewsbury, where he soon opened a teavern. In the Revolutionary days, when Capt. Cyprian Howe and MunningSawin kept rival inns in Marlboro, there was an old rhyme running like this:
"Uncle Cyp makes the flip
And munning makes the toddy, O."

Children of Samuel and Martha (Bent) How, born in Sudbury:
i. John, b. July 24, 1664; lived in Framingham and Hopkinton.
ii. Mary, b. March 2, 1666; m. 1st, George Farrar, and 2d, Thomas Barnes.
iii. Samuel, b. May 19, 1668; d. in Framingham, 1731.
iv. Martha, b. Oct. 9, 1669; m. Thomas Walker.
v. Daniel, b. Oct. 9 1672; d. 1680.
vi. David, b. Nov. 2, 1674; kept the "Wayside Inn" in Sudbury, until his death, Aug. 3, 1759, when he was succeeded by his youngest son, Ezekial How (b. April 5, 1720, d. Oct. 15, 1796), during the Revolutionary War colonel of the 4th Middlesex Militia. The latte was succeeded by his son Adam How (b. May 15, 1763; d. Dec. 10, 1840), and he in tuen by his son "Squire" Lyman Howe (b. Nov. 6, 1801),a bachelor, at whose death, in April, 1861, it passed out of the Howe name. In 1897 it was again re-opened as a place of public entertainment.
vii. Hannah, b. April 6, 1677; m. John Barnes. 
Bent Martha
 
186 (II) Robert Bent, second child of John Bent (i) was born September, 1566, in Penton-Grafton, England. He married Agnes Gosling, who followed her son to New England, and died in May or June, 1639, on the ship "Jonathan," in Boston harbor. He died before that. Children of Robert and Agnes Bent: Margaret, baptized March 28, 1590; Richard, bantized May 7, 1592; John, see forward; Maria, baptized September 24, 1598, died young; Dennis, bantized December 10, 1599, resided in New Salem, Wiltshire, England; Agnes, baptized July 16, 1602; James, married and remained in England. Bent Robert
 
187 12. ABIGAIL, ft. Feb. 4, 1664; m. Dec. 10, 1684, Benjamin Harrington, son of Robert and Susannah Harrington, ft. in Watertown, Jan. 26, 1662; ti. 1724; shed. Jan. 12, 1754. They had:
i. BENJAMIN, b. Oct. 2, 1685.
ii. ABIGAIL, b. March 1, 1689.
iii. ISAAC, b. Feb. 2, 1693.
iv. THANKFUL, b. Sept. 20, 1701. 
Bigelow Abigail
 
188 JOHN BAGULEY, or BIGELOW, as the name is now written, was baptized in England, Feb. 10, 1617 ; he came to Watertown early, where he m. Oct. 30, 1642, Mary Warren, also b. in England. She d. Oct. 19, 1691, and he m. 1694, Sarah Bemis. He d. July 14, 1703, aged 86. He was the ancestor of the numerous families of Bigelows in New England. He had 12 children — 6 sons and 6 dau. The name is variously written in the Watertown records — Bigulah, Biglo, and Biglow.

The Bigelows came to Marl, between 1690 and 1700, from Watertown. This family was early in the country, and may be traced to a remote period in England, even to the reign of Henry III., when the namewas written Baguley, and was derived from the place where they dwelt. Richard at that time was lord of Baguley, and his descendants took the name of the place. In the reign of Henry VII. Ralph de Baguley was lord of Ollerton Hall, and d. 1540, leaving Randall and Nicholas. Randall d. 1556, and his sons, Philip and Robert, divided his estate. Robert died 1582, leaving Randall and John, both of whom moved to Suffolk. Randall d. 1626, leaving two sons, Francis and John. Francis d. 1657, and gave by will a portion of his property to his brother John, then in New England.

BIGELOW FAMILY. John Bigelow (1), the common ancestor of the Worcester families of the same surname, was the progenitor of Mary Wood- bury Bigelow, who married Stephen Sawyer of Worcester.

John Bigelow is believed to have come from England, but the variations in spelling at the time of his emigration to New England make it difficult to trace this name, which was spelled according to the fancy of the writers. He was born in 1617 and came to America before 1642. The first mention of his name on the records is found in Water- town, Massachusetts, where, September 30, 1642, he married Mary, daughter of John and Margaret Warren, and said to have been born in England. She died October 19, 1691. He took the oath of fidelity at Watertown in 1652, and was made a freeman April 18, 1690. He was a blacksmith by trade, and was allowed certain timber for the building of his forge by the town. He was highway surveyor 1652 and 1660: constable 1663, and one of the selectmen 1665, 1670 and 1671. His homestead consisted of six acres. He married (second) October 2, 1694, Sarah, daughter of Joseph Bemis, of Watertown. (See Bemis). He died July 14, 1703, aged eighty-six. His will was dated January 4, 1703, and proved July 23, 1703. The children of John and Mary (Warren) Bigelow were: 1. John, born October 27, 1643, married Rebecca Olmstead, lived in Hartford, Connecticut. 2. Mary, born March 14. 1648. married. June 3, 1674, Michael Flagg. son of Thomas and Mary Flagg; he was born March 23. 1651, and died about 17n; she died before, as he married (second) Mary Earle. 4. Daniel, born December 1, 1650, married Abigail Pratt, lived in Framingham, Massachusetts. 5. Samuel, born October 28, 1653, married Mary Flagg, lived in Water- town. 6. Joshua, born November 5, 1655, married Elizabeth Flacg, lived in Watertown and Westminster. 7. Elizabeth, born June 15. 1657, married Lieut. John Stearns, and lived in Billerica. Massachusetts, where they had a large family of children; she diedApril 18, 1694. 8. Sary, born September 29, 1650. married July 23, 1679, Isaac Learned, son of Isaac and Mary (Stearns) Learned. He was born October 5, 1655. They moved to Framingham. near the Sherborn line. He was selectman of Framingham in 17n. 9. James, married thrice, resided in Watertown. 10. Martha, born April 1, 1662, married twice; her second husband was Obadiah Woods, of East Hartford, Connecticut; he died April n, 1712. n. Abigail, born February 4, 1664, married, December 10, 1684, Benjamin Harrington. 12. Hannah, born March 4, 1666, died March 8, 1666. 13. A son, born and died December 18, 1667. 
Bigelow John
 
189 JOHN BIGELOW m. June 12, 1696, Jerusha Garfield, and settled in Marl. In 1705, being at Lancaster, at the garrison house of Mr. Thomas Sawyer, he was, with Mr. Sawyer and his son Elias, taken by the Indians, and conveyed to Canada. They obtained their release in the following manner. Both of them were ingenious mechanics — Sawyer a blacksmith, and Bigelow a carpenter. While at Montreal, they proposed to the French Governor, that in case he would procure their ransom, they would erect for him a saw-mill, there being none at that time in Canada. The offer was readily accepted ; they fulfilled their engagement ; and after some delays, they were permitted to return to their friends. Mr. Bigelow, in token of his gratitude for his remarkable deliverance from captivity, called his daughter, bornafter his return, " Comfort,'" and a second, "Freedom," as expressive of the happiness and peace he then enjoyed, compared with what he suffered while a prisoner. He d. Sept. 8, 1769, aged 94 years, 4 mos. and 7 days. She d. Jan. 10, 1758. Bigelow John
 
190 SAMUEL BIGELOW m. June 3, 1074, Mary Flagg. He resided in Watertown, which he represented, 1708, '9, and '10. He was an innholder from 1702 to 1710. He had ten children, several of whom settled in Marl.

(II) Samuel Bigelow, son of John Bigelow (r), born October 28, 1653; married, June 3, 1674, at the same time that his sister Mary was married, Mary Flagg, daughter of Thomas and Mary Flagg. She was born January 14, 1658, and died September 7, 1720. He was a prominent man in Watertown, an innholder 1702-16; and represented the town in the general court 1708, 1709 and 1710. His will, dated September 30, 1720, proved February 21, 1731, mentioned his sons John, Samuel, Thomas and Isaac; daughters Mercy Garfield, Abigail Cutler and Deliverance Stearns ; sons-in—law Thomas Read, Josiah Howe and Daniel Warren; grandchildren David Bruce, Nathaniel Read, Isaac Read, Thomas Read, Catherine Read, Phinehas Howe, Abraham Howe, Rachel Howe, Samuel Warren, Daniel Warren and Hannah Warren. The children of Samuel and Mary (Flagg) Bigelow were: 1. John, born May 9, 1675, married Jerusha Garfield, lived in Marlboro. 2. Mary, born September 12, 1677, married, February 2, 1700, David Bruce, of Marlboro; married (second) Thomas Read, Jr., of Sudbury. 3. Samuel, born September 18, 1679, married Ruth Warren, lived in Marlboro. 4. Sarah, born October 1, 1681, married, December n, 1706, Josiah Howe, of Marlboro, a grandson of John Howe, the first settler. (See Howe). 5. Thomas, born October 24. 1683, married Mary Livermore, of Watertown. 6. Mercy, born April 4, 1686 (recorded Martha), married January 2, 1707, Lieut. Thomas Garfield (See Garfield) ; she died February 23, 1745, and he died February 4, 1752. 7- Abigail, born May 7, 1687, married, August 1, 1710, Jonathan Cutler, of Killingly, Connecticut, resided at Colchester, Connecticut. 8. Hannah, born May 24, 17n, married Daniel Warren and they lived in Westboro, Shrewsbury; he was a soldier in the French and Indian war, and was taken prisoner to Canada. 9. Isaac, born May 19, 1691, married Mary Bond, and lived in Colchester, Connecticut. 10. Deliverance, born September 22, 1695, married August 10, 1715, John Stearns of Lexington, Massachusetts, resided in Worcester, where many descendants have lived. 
Bigelow Samuel
 
191 CONCERNING the ancestry of John Biglo, the progenitor of the Bigelows of this country, we are unable to get any satisfactory account, traditions are so numerous and conflicting that we can place no reliance upon any of them ; they would make our common ancestor a native of Wales, Scotland, Ireland and England, as well as a French Huguenot. The most common belief has been that we were of English descent, but a very careful and persistent search has failed to find the name of Biglo or Bigelow upon any public records in that country, various clues have been followed in Scotland and the North of Ireland, but all alike have been found to have no foundation. The English ancestry of the Bigelows, as written by the late H. G. Soinerby, several years ago (and who spent considerable time in searching English records), appears to have its basis upon records of the Beagely family found in. the Parish of Wrentham, County of Suffolk, and wills of the same family found in the Probate Court. From theparish register was taken the family of Randley Beagely and Jane his wife ; the youngest was recorded as follows, viz. : " 1616. John y" sonne of Randley Beagely & Jane his wife baptized February y* XVI." and this John he takes to be the John Biglo of Watertown. From the will of Francis Baguley of Wrentham, dated Oct. 20, 1656, he takes the following: u To his brother John Baguley, now living in New England, a certain sum of money, if he comes for it in person within two years," but he fails to show that Randley Beagely had a son Francis, or that Francis Baguley was any way related to John Beagely by the records.

From a recent letter of the present rector of Wrentham to Mr.. Poultney Bigelow of New York we learn that John Beagely was baptized Feb. 16, 1616, and was buried 1626, and his widow, Jane Beagely, was buried 1626, which would appear as though he was not baptized until nearly grown at least, and his birth could hardly correspond with that of our ancestor. Thus from the incomplete and conflicting records we are reluctantly compelled to abandon for a time any attempt to establish a line of ancestry for our early progenitor John Biglo. He probably had no brothers in this country, but we find one Elizabeth Bigelow, who married Dea. Richard Butler of Hartford, and from the name and dates we suppose her to be a sister of John Higlo. Richard Butler emigrated from Braintree, Essex Co., England, in1632, and settled first in Cambridge, Mass., was a member of Rev. Thomas Hooker's church, made a freeman 1634, and in 1635 he went with Rev. Mr. Hooker, Elder Stone and others to commence the settlement at Hartford. He was chosen deacon of the first church in that town, and was twice married, but we have no date of either marriage. A private record says that he had five children by his second wife, Elizabeth (Bigelow). The following is a partial list of his children by both marriages.

By first marriage:
MARY, ft. 1635; m. Samuel Wright; lived in Wethersfleld.
THOMAS, b. 1637; m. Sarah Stone.
SAMUEL, b. 1039; m. Mary Olmsted; lived in Wethersflcld.
NATHANIEL, b. 1641; m. Sarah ; lived in Wethersfleld.

By second marriage:
ELIZABETH, ft. 1643; m. Dea. Joseph Olmsted.
JOSEPH, ft. 1648; m. Mary Goodrich; lived in Wethersficld.
DANIEL, ft. ; m. Mabel Olmsted ; lived in Hartford.
HANNAH, ft. ; m. John Green of Fairfleld, Ct.

Dea. Richard Butler died in Hartford, Aug. 6, 1684 ; his widow, Elizabeth (Bigelow) Butler, died Sept. 11, 1691.
The first mention we find of John Biglo appears on the Water- town Town Records, where his marriage is the first marriage recorded in that town, viz.: "1642-30-8. John Bigulah and Mary Warin joyned in mariag before Mr. Nowell." She was the daughter of John and Margaret Warren and is said to have been born in England; she bore him thirteen (13) children and died Oct. 19, 1691. From the list of those who took the oath of fidelity at Watertown, 1652, we find that John Biggalough was one of the number and he became a freeman April 18, 1690, which we find from the roll of freemen written as John Bigolo; under the same date we find Samuel Begaloo was made a freeman, and by another list, dated May 16, 1690, we find Samuel Biggilo and John Warren, Jr., were made freemen. On the returns of soldiers who were in the service from Nov. 25 to Dec. 8, 1675, we find the names John Bigulah, Sr., Michaeli Flegg and Isaac Leonard, the last named being wounded. Thus we find the name variously spelled by different officials, but
when we find the name written by any member of the family in those early days it is written Biglo, Biglow, Bigelo or Bigelow. His trade appears to have been that of a blacksmith, as appears by the following taken from the town records: "Agreed wth John Biglo y' for ten trees the towue allowed him for the setting up a shop for a Smithes forge, y'1 he shall either goe on with y' his promise of setting up his trade, w'h is the trade of a Smith w'Mn one twelfmonth after the date hearof or else to pay unto the towne ten shillings for these ten trees he acknowledged to have off the townes." Dated March 4, 1651. He was chosen a Surveyor of Highways 1652 and 1660, a Constable 1663, and one of " the seven men " (t. e., Selectman) in 1665, '70, '71. His homestead consisted of six acres and was bounded north by Richard Ambler and William Parker, east by Thomas Straight, south by the highway, and on the west by Miles Ivés. After the death of his wife Mary he married second, Oct. 2, 1694, Sarah Bemis, daughter of Joseph Bemis of Watertown. He died July 14, 1703, at the ripe old age of 86 years. His will, dated Jan. 4, 1703, was proved July 23, 1703, and is as follows :

In the name of Gad amen. I John Biglo of Watertown in the county of Midd'x within her Majesties Province of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, being weeke of body, but in sound disposing Memory prais be given to god for the same. Do make this my last will & testament, in manner & form following, that is to say first & principally I resign my soul into the mercy full hands of allmighty god my Creator assuredly hoping through the mercy of my blessed Saviour to obtain pardon commission of all my sins and my body I comit to the earth whence it was taken, to be decently buried by the discreshion of my executors hereinafter named and as for the worldly goods & estate, the lord hath lone me I dispose thereof as follows.

Imp", I give & bequeath unto Sarah my well beloved wife, and to her heirs & assigns forever, all the lands and movable
estate, that was hers before our marriage, and forty pounds in money, twenty pounds of s'd money to be p'd her within oue
month after my decease and twenty pouuds within one year after my dece's' I give unto her forty pounds waight of good
pork, three bushels of barley, and one bushel of indian corn, five pounds waight in butter & five pounds waight in Chees,
and also two Sheep, and half the flax that shall be in the house at my Deces — and that to be in full satisfaction of her thirds.

2ndly I give & bequeath to my eldest son John Biglo, & to his heirs & assigns forever, twenty pounds in money to be p'd within one year after my Deces, and in case my s'd son have an heir lawfully begotten of his own body, I give & bequeath his s'd heir twenty pounds in money to be p'd to him or her, when it shall be of twenty one years of age, or day of marriage which shall first happen, but if it hapon my s'd son deces without an heir as above s'd, then my will is y't ye aboves'd twenty pounds be equally devided between my children then surviving.

3dly I give & bequeath unto my son Jonathan Biglo, and to his heirs & assigns forever, twenty five pounds in money to be p'd him w"'in one year after my deces.

4thly I give & bequeath to my son Daniell Biglo and to his heirs & assigns forever, twenty five pounds in money to be p'd
him within one year after my deces.

5thly I give & bequeath to my son Samuel Biglo, and to his heirs & assigns forever ten pounds in money besides what he
hath already had, to be p'd him within one year after my deces.

6thly". I give & bequeath unto my son Joshua Biglo, and to his heirs & assigns forever two parcels of lands lying on the westerly side of bow brook in s'd town. Purchased of Leiut Cha' Hammond as maymore fully appear hy the deed of the
same, and twenty five pounds in money, to be p'd him within one year after my deces.

7Iy. I give & bequeath unto my son James Biglo fifteen pounds, which I lent him as may appear by a bond under his hand and seal, and I give & bequeath to my said son James' son James Biglo ten poundsin money to be p'd him if he shall live to the age of twenty one years, but if it so happen that he deces. before s'd age, then ye s'd ten pounds to be equally devided between my s'd son James' surviving children, when they shall be of the age of twenty one years or day of marriage which shall first happen.

8lhly. I give & bequeath to my Daughter Mary Flagg & to her heirs & assigns forever, twenty five pounds in money to be
p'd her with two years after my Deces.

9thly. I give & bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Sterns' children twenty five pounds in money, to be p'd them, when
they are twenty one years of age, or day of marriage which shall first happen.

10thly. I gjve an(j bequeath to my daughter Sarah Learned, and to her heirs and assigns forever, twenty five pounds in
money, within three years after Deces.

11thl?. I give & bequeath to my daughter Martha Wood's children, lawfully begotten of her own body, twenty five pounds
in money to be p'd them equally a like, when they shall arrive at the age of twenty one years or day of marriage, which shall first happen.

12thly. I give & bequeath unto my Daughter Abigail Herrington & to her heirs & assigns, twenty five pounds in money, to
be p'd within fower years after my Deces.

and I nominat, ordain & appoint, my above s'd son Joshua Biglo and my son in Law Isaac Larnerd my Sole executors, to se, this my last will & testament performed and all the rest and residue of my estate not herein bequeathed, after all my just debts and funerall charges are p'd my will is that it be devided between my s'd executors, that is to say, two parts of three, to my s'd son Joshua, and one third to my son in Law Isaac Leanerd, and do request my trusty & well beloved friend, Capt Benj Garfield to be my overseer of this my last will & testament, my s'd executors to allow him out of my estate for his cost & charges reasonable sattisfaction to his content, Revoking & makiug null and void all former or other wills by me heretofore made. In witness hereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this fourth day of January one thousand seven hundred two-
three, and in the first year of the reign of our Lady Anna, by the Grace of God over England & Queen.

JOHN + BIGLO
Signed, sealed & published
Witnesses
SAM'L LIVERMORE
DANIEL HARRINGTON
MUNNING SAWIN

The inventory of his estate amounted to £627-12-00. Among the expenses charged for the funeral we find several pairs of black gloves, twenty gallons of wine, bottles for the same, allspice and sugar,and two men and horses to carry the wine and other articles to the funeral, also "a man and horse to notify John Stearns at Billerica to attend the funeral," "a man and horse to Sherburne to notify Isaac Larned and wife to attend the funeral."

The children were all born in Watertown and were:
2. JoHN, b. Oct. 27, 1643 ; m. Rebecca Olmsted ; lived in Hartford, Ct.
3. JoNATHAN, b. Dec. 11, 1646; m. Rebecca Shepard; lived in Hartford, Ct.
4. MARY, 6. March 14, 1648 ; m. June 3, 1674, Michael Flagg, son of Thomas and Mary Flagg (or Flegg as the name is written in some of the early records) of Watertown, where they lived and died; he was born March 23, 1651, and died about 1711 ; his wife Mary died earlier, as he married a second time in 1704 Mary Earle.
Three children were recorded by his first wife as follows :
i. ABIGAIL, 6. 1685.
ii. MICHAEL, 6. 1689.
iii. MARY, b. 1691 ; m. William Hager, 1711.
5. DANIEL, b. Dec. I, 1650; m. Abigail Pratt; lived in Framingham.
6. SAMUEL, b. Oct. 28, 1653; m. Mary Flagg; lived in Watertown.
7. JOSHUA, b. Nov. 5, 1655; »?. Elizabeth Flagg; lived in Watertown and Westminster.
8. ELIZABETH, b. June 16, 1657; m. Lieut. John Stearns, and lived in Billerica, Mass., where they had a large family of children, and she died April 18, 1694. Their children were as follows :
i. ELIZABETH, b. Sept. 23, 1677.
ii. JOHN, b. Jan. 22, 1680; d. young,
iii. SARAH, b. Mar. 21, 1682.
iv. MARY, b. July 23, 1684.
v. JOHN, b. Nov. 26, 1686.
vi. ISAAC, b. May 1, 1689.
vii. ABIGAIL, b. Aug. 22, 1691.
9. SARY, b. Sept. 29, 1659 ; m. July 23, 1679, Isaac Leanerd, son of Isaac and Mary (Sternes) Leanerd, and was born Oct. 5, 1655. They moved to Framingham near the Sherburne line, where they lived for many years. In 1711 he served the Town of Framingham as one of the Selectmen. He died Sept. 15, 1737, leaving a large family, viz. :
i. ISAAC, b. May 10, 1680; m. Nov. 19, 1706, Sarah Howe; res. Sherburne, Mass.
ii. Sarah vn, b. March 16, 1682.
iii. ABIGAIL, b. March 11, 1684.
iv. MARY, b. April 12, 1686 ; m. William Bond of Watertown.
v. WILLIAM, b. Feb. 12, 1688.
vi. EBENKZKR, b. Aug. 31, 1690; m. Oct. 14, 1714, Deborah
Haynes ; res. Oxford, Mass.
vii. SAMUEL, b. Oct. 4, 1692.
viii. HANNAH, b. Sept. 16, 1694; m. May 2, 1716, Obadiah Walker; res. Marlborough, Mass. They had Silas, Hannah and Obadiah.
ix. ELIZABETH, b. July 27, 1696.
x. MOSES, b. April 29, 1699 ; m. Lydia ; res. Framingham.
10. JAMES ; m. three times ; res. Watertown.
11. MARTHA, ft. April 1, 1662; m. twice: her second husband was Obadiah Woods of East Hartford, Ct., who d. April 11, 1712, but we have no further record of her family.
12. ABIGAIL, ft. Feb. 4, 1664; m. Dec. 10, 1684, Benjamin Harrington, son of Robert and Susannah Harrington, ft. in Watertown, Jan. 26, 1662; ti. 1724; shed. Jan. 12, 1754. They had:
i. BENJAMIN, b. Oct. 2, 1685.
ii. ABIGAIL, b. March 1, 1689.
iii. ISAAC, b. Feb. 2, 1693.
iv. THANKFUL, b. Sept. 20, 1701.
13. HANNAH, b. March 4, 1666 ; d. March 8, 1666.
14. A SON, b. and d. Dec. 18, 1667.
 
Biglo John
 
192 ADV 10/14/09 found at http://genealogytrails.com/kan/smith/obits1.html

BILLINGS, ARTHUR

DIES IN KANSAS CITY HOSPITAL

News was received Tuesday evening of the death at St. Mary's Hospital in Kansas City, that afternoon of Arthur Billings who was taken to that place last Thursday night where he planned to undergo an operation. He was taken sick about two weeks ago and his condition became such that it was decided that an operation was necessary. He left for Kansas City Thursday night with the intention of undergoing the ordeal but upon his arrival there the specialist pronounced his case in such condition that an operation would be of no avail.

Art was one of our most industrious young men, for the past several years being employed at the Ford Garage, and his death is keenly felt by his many friends.

The remains were returned to this place last night where burial will be made. At the time of going to press funeral arrangements have not been completed. (Transcribed by Judy Kinney from the collection of Clara Diercks Flinton, a life long resident of the Kensington, Kansas area.)

At the close of the year 1886, December 30, the home of Mr and Mrs. Daniel Billings was made happy by the arrival of their first born son, Arthur Edward Billings. Later, two other sons, Walter and Herbert, were welcomed to this home. The family grew up together in Kansas and Iowa.

After reaching manhood Arthur spent some time in the state of Washington. He later returned to Kansas and settled in Kensington where he accepted the position of mechanic in the Ford Garage. While inthis employment during the ministry of Bro McDonald , Arthur was received into the Church. It was also in Kansas that he met and won the heart of Miss Thistle Elizabeth Long to whom he was happily married May 16, 1918. Thus for a period of three years , ten months and twenty-five days they enjoyed each others companionship.

Arthur was taken ill about two week ago and was taken to Kansas City for an operation, however, when he arrived in Kansas City he was advised that an operation would be of no avail. After much intense suffering he quietly passed away in St. Mary's Hospital at 4:15 in the afternoon, April 11, 1922.

Arthur leaves two brothers, Walter and Herbert, one sister-in-law, Mrs. Walter Billings; three uncles, Joe, Will and Ed Billings and William Champeny and an aunt, Mrs. Susan Bride. The relatives of Mrs. Billings are her mother, Mrs. Long, two brothers Phil and Ray Long; uncle and aunt Mr. and Mrs Loren Fairbank of Hastings, Nebr., and Mrs. Mina Ward of Bloomington, Nebr.

He serves his country best
Who lives pure life and death righteous deed;
Who walks straight paths, however others stray,
And leaves his all and uppermost bequest
A stainless record which all men may read.
This is the better way.
No drop but serves the slowly lifting tide.
No dew but has an errand to some flower
No smallest star but sheds some helpful ray;
And man by man, each helping all the rest,
Makes the firm bulwark of the country's power.
There is no better way.

Funeral services were held at the Christian Church Friday afternoon at 2 p.m., conducted by Rev. Bowles. Interment was made in the Germantown Cemetery. (Transcribed by Judy Kinney from the collectionof her Great Aunt Clara Diercks Finton) 
Billings Arthur Edward
 
193 Her and her mom were living at her uncle Phillip's during the 1930 Census (ADV 10/14/09). Billings Opal Millis
 
194 Interesting how in the 1910 census her parents birthplaces are listed as Un. = Unown? (ADV 105/09).
She is listed as being born in South Dakota at 1910 Census but Ohio in the 1920 Census. Her parent are also listed in the 1920 census as both having been born in Ohio (ADV 10/5/09).
It looks like she was 24 in 1910 Census, 29 in 1920 Census and 44 in the 1930 census (ADV 10/5/09). 
Bird Mary W.
 
195 Timothy 2 Bishop (John 1 ) , b. July 22, 1740, in New London, d. at Greenwich, Ilorton, Jan. 10, 1827. He m. (1) Apr. 1, 1702, Mercy Harding, undoubtedly dau. of Abraham and Mercy vibber Harding, b. Jan. 30, 1742, d. Aug. 22, 1783, (2) Dec. 18, 1783, Mrs. Mercy (Gore) NcAvcomb, AvidoAV of Simon NeAvcomb, and dau. of Moses and Desire (Burns) Gore, b. in Preston, Conn., Feb. 10, 1743, d. in Horton,June 5, 1827. By bis 1st Avife Timothy Bishop had children: Abigail, b. Apr. 3, 1763, m. to Ebenezer Pitch; Silas, b. Oct. 2, 1764, m. to Anna Wells; Rebecca, b. July 22, 1706, m. to Elijah Calkin; Eunice, b. April 6, 1768, in. to James Prentice Harris; Ezra, b. Mar, 20, 1770, m. Jerusha NeAvcomb; Amy, b. July 4, 1772, m. to Oliver DeWolf (Jehiel and Phebe); Timothy, b. May 7, 1774, m. to Eunice GohBvell; Mercy, b. Feb. 8, 1770, m. to Abrah a m Seaman; Mary, b. Feb. 8, 1776 (a twin with Mercy), m. to NeAvton Wells; Anna, b. Mar. 29, 1779, m. to Samuel Cox. By his 2nd marriage, to Mercy (Gore)NeAvcomb, Timothy had childen: Ebenezer, b. Sept. 13, 1784, d. in 1846; Olive, b. Aug. 9, 1789. Of these two children, Ebenezer, in. Nov. 1, 1809, Anne, dau. of Jesse and Chloe (Olney) LCAVIS, of Barrsborough, b. Dec. 24, 1790, and had children: Jesse LeAvis, b, Jan. 30, 1812, m. Elizabeth Ann Johnson; Augusta Maria Theresa, b. Oct. 23, 1815, m. to EdAvard Young, LL.D.; John Leander, M. D., of Philadelphia, Penn., and Washington, D. C, b. July 5, 1820; Edward Bussed, b. Sept. 30, 1822; Ann Sophia, b. May 12, 1825; Nancy Desire, b. Feb. 1, 1828. Olive Avas m. Dec. 20, 1821, to George Boy, of NCAV Minas, formerly of Edinburgh, Scotland, founder of the Boy family of Horton, and had children: Elizabeth Ann; Catherine J a n e ; John George; Barb a r a Maria; William Alexander. Timothy Bishop lived in Grecnw i c h , on the place that his father had previously owned. After his death, as we have said, his son, Ebenezer, and his grandson, EdAvard Russell, lived there.

of the Bishop families of Horton many members have occupied positions of Aaiat. and many have, attained prominence in (lie com- mm ities where they lived. Such Pave been, Pad. Samuel Henry, rud Dr John Leander Bishop, sketches of Avhom will be found in the Personal Sketches in this book; Jess* Lewis Bishop, of Pori'.n, brother of Dr. John beamier; (,'nsiavns IP Bishop of liort"n, m oi Jesse Lewis, a n a n of much public spirit, for manj years nntii Pi present Township Clerk; Watson Bishop, of Dart month, N -'. Suiii-rintondent oi Water Works for that Amen- Calvin d Bishop and his sons of Kantvili ; and Ch irles A. Bishop, of the Illinois Ihua aon oi Adoli* bus and Joanna (Willett) Bishop of Ilorton, created a county judge in 1886. rod circuit judge in 1897. He -,-. as b. in Tlorton, Sept.dd. 1S54. and d. in Illinois, Aug. 26, 1907. 
Bishop Timothy
 
196 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
197 His mother was living with him during the 1930 Census (ADV 10/23/09).
 
Bissell Wilbur Clare
 
198 His wife is listed as a widow during the 1930 Census (ADV 10/23/09). Bissell William E.
 
199 Detail: Westerly Sun, obituary
Date:
Notes: The reason for Aubrey's suicide is that he had just been told that he was going to loose his sight. Per Harry Sidebottom as told to Barbara Fallon.
Actual text: Mr. Blacklock is Apparent Suicide
Hopkinton - the body of a 74 year old Hope Valley man was discovered at his Woodville Road home Tuesday afternoon, an apparent suicide victim. Hopkinton Police said Aubrey C. Blacklock died of a single gunshot wound to the head. His body was discovered by his stepson, John Cassidy who live next door, at 3:45 p.m. when he arrived to take the victim to a doctor's appointment. Mr. Blacklock was the husband of Elmiron (Remington) Blacklock. Mr. Blacklock was born in Hopkinton, Dec. 2, 1910, a son of the late Herbert and Anne (Stabes) Blacklock. He was employed at Bradford Dyeing Association for over 20 years as a dry cans operator and was a former member of the Hope Valley Fire Department. In addition to his wife and stepson, he is survived by two daughters, Betty Phillips of Carolina and Mrs. Barbara Wilcox of Hope Valley; a step-daughter, Mrs. Stella Cairnes of Hope Valley; a brother, Albert Blacklock of Thousand Oaks, Cal.; eight grandchildren; five stepgrandchildren; and 17 great-grandchildren. Graveside services will be held at Pine Grove Cemetery, Hope Valley, Friday at 10 a.m. There are no calling hours. The Avery Funeral Home, Main Street, Hope Valley, is in charge of arrangements. 
Blacklock Aubrey Clement
 
200 Children:
Phebe Blackshaw
Sarah Blackshaw
Nehemiah Blackshaw
Martha Blackshaw 
Blackshaw Randall
 

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